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Will The Real Guy Kewney Please Stand Up?
Status: Case of mistaken identity
Guy Kewney, editor of newswireless.net, was scheduled to be interviewed by the BBC about the Apple Computer vs. Apple record label case. But as he stood in the lobby of the BBC building waiting to be met by the studio manager, he saw, to his surprise, someone else introduced and then interviewed under his name. Guy Kewney, according to his own description, is "fair-haired, blue-eyed, prominent-nosed, and with the sort of pale skin that makes my dermatologist wince each time I complain about an itchy mole." By contrast, the Guy Kewney being interviewed on air was "Black. Also, he spoke with a French-sounding accent, and he seemed as baffled as I felt."

So what was going on? It turned out that the studio manager had confused a taxi driver sitting in the reception area for Guy Kewney. The taxi driver didn't really understand what was going on and happily followed the studio manager's lead. The Times gives this description of the interview:
The cabbie, who is better qualified to talk about traffic jams in Shepherds Bush, answered questions for several minutes on Apple Computer’s victory at the High Court against Apple Corps, the record label for the Beatles, The Times has learnt. Karen Bowerman, the BBC’s consumer affairs correspondent, asked the driver what the implications were for Apple Computer, which is allowed to continue using its name and symbol for its iTunes music download service. He gave a rambling answer about how people would be able to download songs at internet cafés. Ms Bowerman was nonplussed, but persisted. What about Apple? "I don’t know," the driver replied. "I'm not at all sure what I'm doing here."
I've always thought that many of the "experts" interviewed on news shows aren't much more knowledgeable about the topics being discussed than any random person would be. They just happen to be the first person the news show could find who was willing to go on-air. So I think this cabbie should start a new second career as a freelance expert on all topics. Once he hones his b.s. skills, he could be as good as any of them.
Identity/Imposters
Posted by The Curator on Sat May 13, 2006


Well, there goes that cabbie's 15 seconds of fame!
Posted by stork  on  Sat May 13, 2006  at  02:33 PM
Here's the BBC having a laugh about the whole situation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdyYe7sDlhA&search=BBC apple
Posted by Adrian Rice  on  Sun May 14, 2006  at  01:14 PM
If anyone knows who the nation
Posted by james  in  UK  on  Mon May 15, 2006  at  05:05 AM
an amusing event.. i am sure there would be many who would like to play g.k. and the truth.. the news program turns up to be much more interesting with such mistakes.. boring otherwise..

i tried to find ao out the clip.. and watched it many times.. i wouldn't bother otherwise..
Posted by process..  in  ny  on  Mon May 15, 2006  at  09:31 AM
He wasn't a cabbie, he was an economics and business studies graduate, so please can you do the poor guy a favour and correct your item? The BBC have a correct version on their site http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/4774429.stm
Posted by Louise  in  UK  on  Tue May 16, 2006  at  07:18 AM
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