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The Hoax Museum Blog
Hoaxes, mischief, and misinformation throughout history
This Day in the History of Hoaxes: September 1
Posted by The Curator on Mon Sep 01, 2014
September 1, 1972: Frank Searle's Nessie Photo
On this day in 1972, the Daily Mail ran a photo of the Loch Ness Monster taken by Frank Searle, thereby giving him instant fame as a monster hunter. But ultimately he became known as the most prolific producer of Nessie hoaxes. He initially took photos of floating logs, which he claimed to be Nessie, but progressed to cutting-and-pasting drawings of dinosaurs into Loch Ness scenes, at which point even the most die-hard Nessie believers stopped taking him seriously. Searle was the inspiration for the monster-hunter character in the 1995 film Loch Ness starring Ted Danson. [Cryptomundo]
Categories: This Day in History Comments (0)
Cracked’s Top 10 Greatest Hoaxes
Posted by The Curator on Sun Aug 31, 2014
Cracked recently ran a list of the Top 10 Greatest Hoaxes. And for Cracked, it's a decent list. Which is to say that my expectations were pretty low, but they actually managed to choose some hoaxes which legitimately qualify as classics. Until you get to #4 on the list, which sticks out like a sore thumb. It's the "NASA Moon Landing Hoax." What is that doing on the list? It would be relevant on a Top 10 Conspiracy Theories list, but not a Great Hoaxes list.
Categories: Conspiracy Theories Comments (2)
This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 31
Posted by The Curator on Sun Aug 31, 2014
August 31, 1987: The Great Potato Play
During a game between the double-A Williamsport Bills and the Reading Phillies, on this day in 1987, everyone thought they saw catcher Dave Bresnahan throw the ball wild past third base. So how was it that when the man on third came running toward home, Bresnahan still had the ball and tagged him out? It was because Bresnahan had actually thrown a peeled potato into left field, and not a ball. The stunt cost Bresnahan his job with the Bills, but it also earned him an immortal place in baseball history, becoming forever known as the Great Potato Play. A year after the event, fans paid one dollar and one potato as admission to celebrate Dave Bresnahan Day. More…
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Electric Sugar Hoax on Travel Channel
Posted by The Curator on Sat Aug 30, 2014
I learned from this article on heritage.com that the "Electric Sugar" hoax of 1889 was featured on Friday night on the Travel Channel's Monumental Mysteries show. (To be honest, I've never watched that show.) The sugar hoax is pretty obscure, but interesting. Nice to see it get some attention. I posted an article about it here on the site back in 2011.
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This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 30
Posted by The Curator on Sat Aug 30, 2014
August 30, 2000: Prison Escape Prank
On this day in 2000, residents of Millbrae, CA were terrified when two handcuffed men in orange jail jumpsuits went around the neighborhood, pounding on doors, asking for help in removing their shackles. The police soon arrived and arrested "Big Joe" Lopez and Graham Herbert who, it turned out, were merely posing as prisoners as part of an on-air prank for San Francisco station KYLD-FM. Lopez was sentenced to 45 days in county jail. Herbert (who was a 19-year-old intern) got a year's probation. [sfgate.com]
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Yeti Footprint Photos For Sale
Posted by The Curator on Sat Aug 30, 2014
Eric Shipton's Yeti footprint photos, taken on his 1951 Everest expedition, are going up for sale. These photos played a big role in Bigfoot history since it was these photos that inspired a Yeti craze in the media during the 1950s, which then fed directly into the Bigfoot craze that started when giant-size footprints were found in California in 1958. Unlike the footprints found in California, which were a hoax, the prints Shipton found probably were genuine, but misinterpreted. The most likely explanation is that they were bear prints that grew larger as they melted in the sun. Not Yeti prints.
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Champagne Tablets
Posted by The Curator on Sat Aug 30, 2014
Earlier this month, images of a new product, instant champagne tablets, went viral in France. They were supposedly the creation of the champagne label Veuve Clicquot. You drop a few tablets in a glass of water and a minute later you'd have a glass of champagne. The product had been given the name "Shh...ampagne". Yes, this was a hoax. And it was a hoax done without the permission of Veuve Clicquot, whose name was attached to the fictitious product. The phony ad campaign was the work of a Russian ad agency called
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This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 29
Posted by The Curator on Fri Aug 29, 2014
August 29, 1923: Grover Bergdoll's Gold
The claim that a road worker had discovered Grover Bergdoll's buried pot of gold prompted a two-day investigation by federal agents. But on this day in 1923, the story was revealed to be a practical joke among the workers that spun out of control. The pot of gold in question was believed to have been buried by the wealthy draft dodger Bergdoll in 1917. He escaped prison in 1920 by convincing his guards of its existence and then slipping free of them when they accompanied him to find it. Treasure hunters continued to look for it. But in 1939, after finally surrendering to authorities, Bergdoll admitted there was no buried pot of gold. [Pennsylvania Historical Society]
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Das Can-in-Stein
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 28, 2014
April Fool becomes reality. ThinkGeek first introduced "Das Can-in-Stein" on April 1st, as an April Fool's Day joke. The idea was to insert your beer can into the device so that you could pretend you were drinking from a pewter beer stein. ThinkGeek has now decided to sell this product for real. You can purchase one for $10.
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For ZZ Top, life imitates hoax
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 28, 2014
In 2012, a ZZ Top fan made a hoax video that purported to show the trio performing the 1955 folk-country classic "Sixteen Tons" with guitarist Jeff Beck. In a case of life imitating hoax, Jeff Beck and ZZ Top recently performed together in L.A., and they decided to play "Sixteen Tons" — because of the fan's hoax video. Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top said, "It’s a mega meta kinda thang. [LA Times]
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Sailing Stones Explained
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 28, 2014
The Sailing Stones of Death Valley are the real-life counterpart of Dan De Quille's 1867 hoax about the "traveling stones" of Pahranagat Valley. The sailing stones mysteriously move across dried mud, leaving tracks behind them. For a long time, no one knew exactly what made the sailing stones move. But now researchers have figured it out. [Discover]
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The Shadwell Shams
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 28, 2014
The Spitalfields Life blog has a brief account (with lots of pictures) of the so-called Shadwell Shams. These were supposedly medieval trinkets, specifically pilgrim's badges (tens of thousands of them), that a pair of forgers, William Smith & Charles Eaton (aka Billy & Charley), claimed to have found in the mud along the Thames. The pair did a good business for over 10 years, from 1856 to 1867, managing to completely fool most archaeologists. The article notes that, "today their Shadwell Shams are commonly worth more than the genuine antiquities they forged."
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This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 28
Posted by The Curator on Thu Aug 28, 2014
August 28, 1972: Clifford Irving Goes to Prison
On this day in 1972, Clifford Irving began serving a 2½-year sentence for conspiracy and fraud on account of selling publisher McGraw-Hill a fake autobiography of billionaire Howard Hughes, for which he was paid $750,000. By the time he went to prison, he had returned $500,000 of that money. He was released early after serving 16 months. More…
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Happy Meal Ouija Board
Posted by The Curator on Wed Aug 27, 2014
After Amy Bruni (of SyFy's Ghost Hunters) posted on Facebook about how excited she was that McDonald's had decided to offer a Ouija Board as the new Halloween Happy Meal toy, so many people believed her that Snopes debunked the rumor the next day.
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An interview with a fake news site
Posted by The Curator on Wed Aug 27, 2014
The American Press Institute interviews the founders of Nipsys News, which is one of those sites that allows anyone to create fake news stories. Most recently Nipsys was responsible for a viral hoax alleging that the the legal drinking age in the U.S. would soon change to 25. The founders of Nipsys gloss over the ethics of what they're doing with some hand-waving about "freedom of expression." But at the end of the interview they offer some advice about how to identify fake news. And it's actually good advice: "We just advise readers to check if the information from the article can be found in other sources as well. Don’t trust just one source."
Categories: Journalism Comments (1)
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All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.