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April Fool's Day, 1909

←1908      1910→

Were you one of them? (1909) April Fool cartoon by Johnny "Grue" Gruelle (creator of Raggedy Ann), that ran in many American papers.
Agnes Scott College Walkout (1909) All the students at Agnes Scott women's college in Georgia departed from the campus and spent the day in Atlanta (while wearing their mortar boards) shopping and going to movies. They left a note for their teachers in the empty classrooms: "April 1: is this your birthday?"
Delivery Prank (1909) "Paris, April 1 — The royalist students who recently were condemned to imprisonment and fines by M. Hammerd, justice of the peace, for mutilating statues and demonstrating in the streets and theaters, have taken a humorous revenge against the justice. They ordered 400 wagon loads of merchandise of every description, from pianos to coal, delivered at M. Hammerd's residence. Traffic was impeded and the irate drivers were with difficulty induced to depart without leaving their loads."