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Hamster Huey and the Gooey Kablooie
image I received the following email from Joe Mason. Instead of summarizing it, I'll just cut-and-paste the whole thing:

Amazon has a listing for "Hamster Huey and the Gooey Kablooie". The book also has a homepage at http://www.hamsterhueypress.com/, and it's listed as being written by "renowned story teller" Mabel S. Barr.

Hamster Huey is, of course, the fictional book written by "Mabel Syrup" in Calvin and Hobbes. It looks like somebody with a vanity press has ripped off the title (I don't think titles are copyrightable, so this may even be legal). This version of "Hamster Huey" certainly isn't a "classic and much-beloved tale" as the publisher claims, so it's a hoax in that sense. I suspect it may go even deeper, and there is no actual book: "At Ms. Barr.s request, only a limited number of copies of this first edition are being printed, and Hamster Huey and the Gooey Kablooie is sure to sell out soon." That's an easy excuse for not shipping a single copy.

So - is this a vanity press trying to pass off its book as a famous title? Or is someone having a chuckle by tricking Amazon into printing a fake book listing?


I guess the easiest thing to do would be to order the book and see what arrives, but since I don't want to spend the money my hunch would be that it's a real book that's a homage to (or inspired by) the fictional book from Calvin and Hobbes. Though I think there would be some intellectual property issues involved if the author of the book being sold on Amazon hadn't got the permission of the Calvin and Hobbes author. As for the issue about the 'limited number of copies', I think they're referring to copies of the first edition. Presumably they could print further editions if the first one sold out. But the real ripoff is that they're charging $7 for an 8-page paperback.
Literature/Language
Posted by The Curator on Wed Mar 23, 2005


Your're right Alex. Titles cannot be copyrighted. But it sounds like they are using characters that are. I can't imagine any self respecting author requesting only a limited number of copies be printed unless it was a vanity press and she could only afford a few.
Posted by Captain Al  in  Vancouver Island, Canada  on  Wed Mar 23, 2005  at  11:57 PM
From the wikipedia entry:


"Due to [C&H Creator Bill] Watterson's strong anti-merchandising sentiments and his reluctance to return to the spotlight, almost no legitimate Calvin and Hobbes material exists outside of the published collections of newspaper strips."

Other net resources refer to his tendency to litigate any trademark violations, so if this is a hoax, it could prove to be a very costly one.
Posted by andy  in  brooklyn  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  12:03 AM
Calvin And Hobbes fixed wikipedia link.

There. I'm learnin.

I'd like it if Hamster Huey was real, but I kinda doubt it. I'll look around and see what I can see..
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  12:21 AM
http://www.planetmackin.com/prose_htm/hamsterhuey

hamster huey is dead. it's sad, really.
he was a nice fellow.

i did a search on the isbn listed for the book and found nothing. i google'd it and also checked it at http://www.gettextbooks.com as i have had good luck finding many books with them.
imo this is very definitely a vanity press.
Posted by thephrog  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  12:57 AM
I found the book used, under amazon's isbn, at:
http://www.alibris.com

http://www.alibris.com/search/search.cfm?S=R&qsort=p&qisbn=0974909009&siteID=GuWPtmTDDdQ-qN.eZn0vJuITw.MXGJLBFA

Hamster Huey and the Gooey Kablooie: The Renowned Hero's Most Famous Adventure
by Barr, Mabel price: $6.90
Ships within 2 to 3 days

Edition: First edition. Binding: Trade paperback Publisher: Hamster Huey Press, Gig Harbor, WA Date Published: 2004 ISBN: 0974909009 Description: Nick Goettling illustrations. New. No dust jacket. 8 p. Includes illustrations. Full color illustrations on most pages. Story title is well known but this is first time in print.
seller information:
Name: Carwibble's Closet, WA, USA
Reliability: 4/5
Posted by thephrog  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:04 AM
"hamster huey is dead. it's sad, really.
he was a nice fellow." - thephrog


Hamster Huey's gone
It's sad, really, very sad
He was a nice guy

There. My first Haiku since grade 9.

downer
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:11 AM
Yeah.. Watterson is *rabidly* anti-merchandise. If it wasn't for the fact that those 'pissing Calvin' things have been copied and re-copied by umpteem bazillion window decal peddlers, he'd probably go and bust some kneecaps. I mentioned to a local T-shirt shop that had a (rather nice, actually) Spaceman Spiff T-shirt that he hasn't liscensed anything, and they said "Aw crap.. that one's a good seller.."

I'm thinking that Watterson has some claim possible. He can claim damages on the basis that the phrase appears in his works, and will be assosciated with his cartoon. Therefore, people will think it has been created either by him, or with his consent..

Trust me, Intellectual Property is one of those fields where it only needs to have feathers to be called a duck.
Posted by Bobcat  in  Californian Wierdo  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:22 AM
Aw jeeze.. have you guys seen the review on this?

"Having read as much of this title as possible, I have reached the conclusion that said tome is a fine addition to any Hamster Huey fan's collection of Hamster Huey speculative post-modern children's literature. The intrepid and probably morbidly of obese author has brought forth a book not as hotly anticipated as the soon-to-be-latest Harry Potter saga but in every line of crayon illustration oozes forth with brevid turgidity a vision only marred by the barren landscape of its inspiration. When Alfred Steckler proposed his theory of memelepsy, he prefigured the adjunct symbolizer meme (the omicron-signifier here) ratiocinating a similar paralimpsest that the Kablooie ensteuchifies not unlike the de Vragt neohomoiousion controversy. This does not imply anything to the contrary, however. We find in this an incontrovertible assertion to the opposite effect, namely that Steckler's extension to the deconstructionist ethos does NOT render invalid the Gooey Kablooie's primal importance vis a vis the travails of Huey's porcine ocularism. In summation, I conclude with these final words."

Uh.. huh.
Posted by Bobcat  in  Californian Wierdo  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:25 AM
I hadn't dug into it yet, and now, it seems that there's really no point. I'll just hide in the basement with my C&H books, some kleenex, and a jar of...

red face

Pickles. Gherkins, to be exact.

Yeah, gherkins...

downer

"Don't cry for me, for I am already dead." - B. Gumble
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:39 AM
So when do we get real live boxes of Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs?

They're crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside....
Posted by Barghest  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  04:23 AM
The review seems very ridiculous. "Having read as much of this title as possible..."? Is the reviewer saying they struggled through an eight page book, or just the title on the cover of the book? hmmm
Posted by Smerk  in  to mischief  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  07:46 AM
Yeah, I really love the line:
"...in every line of crayon illustration oozes forth with brevid turgidity..."

It's funny. Although the word 'turgidity' is slightly repulsive.
smile
Posted by Boo  in  The Land of the Haggii...  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  07:56 AM
Okay, closest (most logical) interpretation in common English for "brevid turgidity" is actually contradictory. Brevity means short, to the point, while turgid (in writing) means rhetorical or pretentious, or flowery...(I'm trying to work with a thesaurus here, I haven't found a decent online dictionary, and our hard copy is in the other room.) smirk
Posted by Smerk  in  to mischief  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  08:17 AM
Actually, is it just me, or does that review sound as though it could have been written by Hairy after swallowing a dictionary? smile
Posted by Smerk  in  to mischief  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  08:32 AM
Ha!
Yes, it does rather.
Although it doesn't involve any quarreling with himself...
smile
Posted by Boo  in  The Land of the Haggii...  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  08:41 AM
http://www.hamsterhueypress.com/
Posted by Yaanu  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  12:36 PM
The above hamsterhuey link is registered to Hamsterhuey(dot)com.

It is registered through http://www.domainsbyproxy.com so you can't tell who REALLY registered it.

To sell a book on amazon, you need an ISBN number.

ISBN info and search tools can be found here.

A search of the database shows that the ISBN number listed with the book both on ebay and on the hamsterhuey website DOES NOT EXIST.

Therefore, the book does not, either. (Unless, of course, their database is not up to date)
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:14 PM
I assume the ridiculous review is the result of a different prankster - there's a long tradition of spoofing Amazon that way.
Posted by JoeNotCharles  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  01:21 PM
Like I said, unless their database is not up to date.
I kept looking, and found this...

These guys have this book listed by isbn number.
However, you don't actually need a book to get this number. Only about a hundred bucks (which would make things even more expensive than just the website...).
These guys have an online ISBM order form here.

Also, the guy has a bunch of quotes from people on his website. They check out to real people, all except for the author and the illustrator. But did these people really say these things?

Paul Spadoni is also real. His phone number and other info check out.

My question NOW is... if this guy has no problem putting all of his contact info on his webpage, why the hell did he pay extra to hide it from a 'whois' search?

I don't think I'll make up my mind now until I see an actual copy of the book.

Anybody wanna gamble that the 2 copies Amazon has listed are real, and order one? I'd love one, if it was real, but hey, I just spent my book budget for the month.
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  02:39 PM
Get Caias to buy it. I hear he's loaded.
Posted by The Curator  in  San Diego  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  02:45 PM
Maybe I'll start a blog and offer to snort pepper TWICE if somebody buys the book for me. That's $7.50 worth of work, right?

wink

On a side note, I read about a "Solar Death Ray" that a guy invented. You know what the first thing into my mind was... (besides the beer).

It actually works. Seriously.

http://www.solardeathray.com/
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  02:53 PM
HAAAAA, Alex made a funny!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posted by X  in  McKinney, TX  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  03:00 PM
Yeah, and then he didn't erase it. tongue wink
Posted by Rod  in  the land of smarties.  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  03:12 PM
Rod, have you ever snorted pepper? If not then I'll up the ante and give a tenner. American, not that funny Canadian stuff. If you have snorted pepper than I probably don't have enough to convince you to do it again. There is nothing funny about holding your head upside down under a water fountain trying to rinse your nose out.

Well, there is but not if you're the one doing it
Posted by Charybdis  in  Hell  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  03:54 PM
The cover looks fishy. I have a feeling I've seen that rabbit somewhere. If I had to guess, I think the monsters came from one children's book, and the hamster and rabbit from a different one.

I read the What Others are Saying About... section and the first review is by the webmaster of calvinandhobbesfanclub.com, which is a real website. She has a link on her site announcing the new book. However, it's a very simplistic site; the whole purpose appears to be to download a card that says you are a member of the Calvin and Hobbes fan club. It could very well have been created to flesh out the hoax.

If it is a hoax, it's a pretty dull one, but I love the Amazon review. That was hilarious.
Posted by Rochelle  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  04:02 PM
The testimonials state that the book is great for those who have been bullied. Anyone remember Moe?

~Yaanu~
Posted by Yaanu  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  05:10 PM
"In summation, I conclude with these final words."
Reminds me of this essay.
Posted by Citizen Premier  in  spite of public outcry  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  05:11 PM
And more relevantly, I much agree with Watterson's anti-merchandise feelings, and wish the author of this book would just keel over.
Posted by Citizen Premier  in  spite of public outcry  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  05:13 PM
Don't forget, there's a sequel if this one sells well! "Commander Coriander Salamander and 'er Singlehander Bellylander."

Bill Watterson is going to be furious when he finds out about this.
Posted by PlantPerson  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  05:16 PM
Chary, we think alike. I was just saying to pony up the $7.50, especially if he could film it. smile
Posted by Winona  in  USA  on  Thu Mar 24, 2005  at  11:43 PM
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