The Museum of Hoaxes
hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive hoax archive
   
The Hoax Museum Blog
Category: Folklore/Tall Tales
Santa’s Female Reindeer — David Emery has posted an intriguing piece of netlore concerning the gender of Santa's reindeer. Here's the text of the email that's going around: According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, while both male and female reindeer grow antlers in the summer each year (the only members of the deer family, Cervidae, to have females do so), male reindeer drop their antlers at the beginning of winter, usually late November to mid December. Female reindeer retain their antlers…
Posted: Sun Dec 05, 2004.   Comments (17)

Do You Believe in Santa Claus? — A British psychiatrist, Lynda Breen, has concluded that belief in Santa Claus is actually good for the moral development of children. Apparently believing in the existence of a jolly red-suited man who "'knows if you've been bad or good' helps teach children the difference between right and wrong." As much as my first inclination is to make a sarcastic remark about this, I think I'm going to hold back since there's a whole slew of fantastic beings whose existence I find myself very…
Posted: Thu Dec 02, 2004.   Comments (55)

Hometown Tales — Here's a TV show I'd be interested in seeing: Hometown Tales. It's all about various hoaxy/folklore-type things that happen in communities throughout America. The show also has a blog. Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to ever see the program because it's only on public access channels in New Jersey. Well, if they ever make it to the San Diego area I could definitely find some hoaxy things to share with them, such as the landing spot on Mt. Palomar where George Adamski first made…
Posted: Thu Nov 18, 2004.   Comments (1)

The Belly Button Plant — Vincent linked to this in the hoax forum, and I thought it was bizarre enough that I should post it here where I can add a poll to it. The story is that 'Stephan M' lost his clothes overboard while on a canoe trip, so he had to wear the same things for the next six days. When he got home he took off his sweater and discovered that a seedling had sprouted in his belly button lint. He took photos of it as proof. Now to me this seems like a joke. I think he just stuck a leafy twig in his…
Posted: Wed Oct 13, 2004.   Comments (16)


90-Foot Babe — Natalia is a "fun-loving, shoe-hoarding, chocolate-loving gal who likes to travel, flirt with cute guys, and hang out with friends." She also happens to be 90 feet tall. You can read all about her adventures on her blog, 90-foot babe. All I can say is that a) she gives new meaning to the term 'tall tale'; and b) she really puts Heather Haven in her place. (via the Hoax Forum)
Posted: Tue Sep 07, 2004.   Comments (4)

Hogzilla Festival — Hogzilla, the 1000lb wild hog supposedly shot and killed in Georgia, has already had its fifteen minutes of internet fame. But now the small town of Alapaha, GA is hoping to extend the fond memories of Hogzilla just a little longer by making the dubious hog the centerpiece of their November festival. They plan to have a Hogzilla float, a Hogzilla information booth, and Hogzilla T-shirts. Maybe they should make Hogzilla fest an ongoing tradition. It could become like the iceworm festival
Posted: Tue Aug 31, 2004.   Comments (1)

The Secret History of the Flying Carpet — In late July an essay appeared in the Australian literary journal Meanjin written by Azhar Abidi. It was titled 'The Secret History of the Flying Carpet'. The essay described the discovery of 13th-century Persian scrolls that suggested there was some truth to the old legends of flying carpets. Ancient Persian artisans had apparently discovered a process of boiling fibers in a magnetic clay before weaving them into a carpet. These magnetized fibers then floated above the ground, repelled…
Posted: Tue Aug 10, 2004.   Comments (6)

Big Corn — Jim sent in this picture of his grandfather posing with an ear of corn, along with this explanation: "My grandfather, Frank Weed, who died in 1949, worked on the railroad for years. He bragged to the other men about how big the Iowa corn was but they wouldn’t believe it. So my father took a picture of him, and of an ear of corn, then cut the negative, pasted the other into the hole and printed it. After that, the criticism of my grandfather’s exaggerations were silenced!" Thanks,…
Posted: Wed Jul 14, 2004.   Comments (4)

The Nullarbor Nymph — Thirty-two years ago the tiny town of Eucla, Australia, on the edge of the Nullarbor plain, became famous when a few of its residents first sighted the Nullarbor Nymph. The Nymph was a blonde, feral, half-naked woman who lived in the bush and ran wild with kangaroos. News of this wild woman quickly spread around the world. President Nixon was asked his opinion of her (reportedly his reply could not be repeated over the air), and the Loch Ness monster sent her a telegram. Sooner or…
Posted: Tue May 18, 2004.   Comments (1)

The Knee Trumpet — Musicians will appreciate this. It's a little known instrument, popular back in the Middle Ages, known as the Tromba Da Gamba, or Knee Trumpet. According to Virgilanti (who managed to acquire one of these rare instruments): "It was gaining a lot in popularity by the start of the 17th century but encountered a bit of a PR problem in 1619 when, according to the story, the pope (presumably Pope Paul V) saw the instrument being played by a woman. He was shocked at the suggestiveness of…
Posted: Tue May 18, 2004.   Comments (2)

Little-Known Attractions of Lynchburg Virginia — I've actually been to Lynchburg, Virginia, but somehow I missed the little-known attractions that it offers, such as the Fletcher Farm Rhino, the ABC Cemetery in which all the graves are in alphabetical order, Mags the headless cat (pictured), and the world's only car that runs on Kool-Aid.
Posted: Mon May 03, 2004.   Comments (5)

Make up a bollex fact — 'Malbec' is running a competition on his LiveJournal page: Make up a fact that's totally untrue, but sounds like it might be the case. For example: "All Ikea flat-pack furniture can be stably constructed using only 3 of the supplied screws."
Posted: Tue Apr 06, 2004.   Comments (0)

Tall-Tale Postcards — The American Museum of Photography has a nice collection of William H. "Dad"�Martin's tall-tale photographs online. Martin made a fortune selling tall-tale postcards during the early twentieth century. He had a company called the Martin Post Card Company based in Ottawa, Kansas.
Posted: Wed Dec 17, 2003.   Comments (0)

Record-Breaking Snowflake — Was the 15 inch snowflake that was recorded to have fallen in eastern Montana on Jan. 28, 1887 a tall tale? It was either that or a bunch of snowflakes frozen together.
Posted: Wed Dec 17, 2003.   Comments (0)

Does Santa Exist? — A Florida elementary school teacher made the mistake of telling her kids that Santa doesn't exist. Now Santa himself is making a special trip down from the North Pole to visit the classroom just to prove that he really does exist. I'm sure the teacher feels appropriately remorseful, but at least she didn't tell her kids that Santa was dead as a British vicar did last year.
Posted: Wed Dec 03, 2003.   Comments (0)

An Email from Mystic Merlin — I got an angry email from Mystic Merlin, creator of the Crop Circles Mystery Board Game that I linked to below. He demanded that I remove all mention of his game from my site because, in his words, 'THIS BOARDGAME IS NOT A HOAX AND HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH HOAXING AT ALL' (caps are his). Of course! How could I have been so foolish as to presume that crop circles have anything to do with hoaxes? My mistake entirely. And yet, I just can't bring myself to remove the link. Sorry, Mystic Merlin.
Posted: Mon Sep 22, 2003.   Comments (2)

Hoax-Themed Board Games — Some board games with hoaxy themes: First, the Crop Circles Mystery Board Game, it's the Game With Healing Energies (via liquito). Next we have Tall Tales, the Game of Legends, Humdingers, and Creative One-Upmanship.
Posted: Thu Sep 18, 2003.   Comments (0)

Baron Munchausen Trading Cards — A cool set of Baron Munchausen trading cards. I'm sure it would cost a lot of money to buy the complete set. Update 8/14/03: I didn't intend to suggest that these cards are a hoax, as a few people queried me about. I linked to them because Munchausen (the fictional character) was a famous teller of tall tales, so the cards appealed to me as an example of hoax memorabilia.
Posted: Wed Aug 13, 2003.   Comments (1)

Master of the Unexplained — He has no fear. He has no limits. He has no common sense. He is Pierre Dubeaumont, Master of the Unexplained. And definitely check out his Questions That Have No Answers.
Posted: Wed Jul 23, 2003.   Comments (0)

It’s Jackalope Hunting Season — June 31 (which was yesterday, or maybe today, or maybe neither) is the only day of the year on which it's legal to hunt jackalopes in the state of Wyoming. You can get your own Jackalope hunting license from the Douglas, Wyoming Chamber of Commerce.
Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2003.   Comments (6)

Page 3 of 4 pages  < 1 2 3 4 > 
All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.