Hoax Museum Blog Posts: October 2007

Pork Stone — No, it's not pork. It's "pork stone." Sohu.com has posted these pictures (which they, in turn, got from the China News Network) of stone that looks like pork. Apparently this stone has been on display at the Suzhou International Expo, and has been attracting a lot of attention. Reportedly, the stone hasn't been altered in any way. It's naturally formed in the earth to look like slabs of pork. It's selling for 120 yuan (about $16) per kg. (via spluch)
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007.   Comments (9)

Exideal LED Therapy — The CScout Japan blog has posted about a new health/beauty product from Japan. It's called the Exideal. It's basically a panel of LED lights that you're supposed to sit in front of as it flickers and pulses. The company claims that the LED light will "“permeate the vitamins and collagen in your skin and make you beautiful from the inside”. This will set you back around $900. I suspect you could probably receive the same health benefits from sitting in front of a regular lightbulb for…
Posted: Fri Oct 12, 2007.   Comments (12)

Did Morrissey predict the death of Princess Diana? — Here's an unusual theory. David Alice, webmaster of dianamystery.com, argues that the singer Morrissey (formerly of The Smiths) predicted the death of Princess Diana. I would dismiss it all as an elaborate joke, except that the guy seems really serious about it. The crux of his argument (at least in the video posted below) is that one of the songs on The Smiths' album The Queen is Dead, speaks about two people getting killed together in a car crash. And this song was released as an…
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007.   Comments (13)

Racelift — Racelift.com is the online home of the Institute of Ethnological and Racial Modification. The staff at the institute claim to have developed powerful new "Racelift Technologies" that allow you to change your race. For instance, among their testimonials is that of Hohepa Mikhailov, who transformed from what looks like a Russian sailor into a New Zealand Maori. His testimonial reads: When I was studying and living with the Native Maori culture of New Zealand, I found it hard to relate…
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007.   Comments (7)


Giant Creme Egg Crushes Car — I'm sure this can't be real. Is it, perhaps, an ad for Cadbury's creme eggs?
Posted: Thu Oct 11, 2007.   Comments (8)

Campus Book Drop Volunteers Wanted — My publisher is looking for approximately 20 volunteers willing to participate in a campus book drop guerilla marketing effort for my new book, Elephants on Acid. Their idea is to have people leave copies of the book in highly visible places, such as on college campuses, where someone else will pick it up. Hopefully this will help spread the word about the book. I'm not sure how many sales these book drop efforts actually create, but it's worth a try (especially since my publisher is…
Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007.   Comments (13)

Cat Urine Criminal — Big Gary sent me a link to this story with the comment, "I'm not sure who was haoxing whom, but something strange is going on here. If there's a hot black market for cat urine, I think I may be rich." From Yahoo! News: Cynthia Hunter spent almost two months in jail over a vial of cat urine. Hunter, 38, was arrested Aug. 15 on a charge of petty theft after she was accused of stealing from a Wal-Mart store. Deputies added charges of possession of a controlled substance after finding a…
Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007.   Comments (7)

True Art or Fake Quiz — Mikhail Simkin has a "true art, or fake" quiz on his website, reverent.org. It doesn't test your knowledge of art forgery. Instead, it tests whether you can spot the difference between what critics call true art (which will cost you thousands of dollars to buy) and fake art (produced by a non-artist, which will cost you nothing). I got a 58%. Below are two images from the quiz. One is a Mark Rothko masterpiece. The other is Mikhail Simkin non-art. I think they both look nice, and…
Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007.   Comments (14)

Three-Headed Dog Costume — Halloween Mart has a page of "Halloween costume masterpieces." I couldn't help but notice the one of the three-headed dog. It reminded me of Vladimir Demikhov's two-headed dogs, that I included on my list of the top 20 most bizarre experiments of all time. On the left is a fake three-headed dog. On the right is a real two-headed dog.
Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007.   Comments (5)

Past Life Analysis — The Past Life Analysis website offers you a chance to find out who you were in your past life. I entered my birthday, and this is what I got: I don't know how you feel about it, but you were male in your last earthly incarnation.You were born somewhere in the territory of modern Egypt around the year 1150. Your profession was that of a writer, dramatist or organiser of rituals. Your brief psychological profile in your past life: Ruthless character, carefully weighing his decisions in…
Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2007.   Comments (17)

Fishmouth — Pictures of an unpleasant looking character, apparently called "Fishmouth," have been circulating via email. As you can see, this guy has done his best to improve his appearance by inserting black disks into his cheeks. It creates a lovely effect, rather like a stormtrooper. It seems that this guy is real. The BodyTwo ModBlog reports that Fishmouth is originally from Poland where everyone called him "ZygZag," but now he's living in a punk squat in Germany. They have some pictures of…
Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2007.   Comments (13)

Making Mountain Dew Glow — Can you make Mountain Dew glow simply by adding some baking soda and hydrogen peroxide to it? That's what this video claims. I was so excited after watching it that I was all prepared to go out, buy a bottle of Mountain Dew, and try the experiment myself. Thankfully I didn't, because the video is a fake. If you watch it closely, you can see that a break occurs after the person pours the Mountain Dew into the glass. During this break is when the contents of a glow stick were added to the…
Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2007.   Comments (32)

The Happy Endings Foundation — The Happy Endings Foundation believes that all children's books should have happy endings. Those that don't should be banned. The organization was (supposedly) started seven years ago by Adrienne Small after she noticed that her daughter seemed miserable after reading Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Mrs. Small plans to rewrite the Lemony Snicket books to give them a happy ending. Some upcoming events planned by the Happy Endings Foundation include a Halloween "fun…
Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2007.   Comments (1)

The Pear Cable Challenge — Last week James Randi heard about some high-end audio cables being sold by the Pear Cable company for $7250 -- $302 a foot. This prompted him to extend his million-dollar challenge (which for years he's been offering to anyone who can prove the existence of the paranormal) to anyone who could detect a difference in sound quality to the human ear between Pear's cables and similar cables sold for only $80 by Monster Cable. The CEO of Pear Cable has now responded (though not directly to…
Posted: Sat Oct 06, 2007.   Comments (12)

Mouse in Beans — Here's something else to add to my page of gross things found in food: LEHI, Utah (AP) -- An Arkansas company is offering $100 to a Utah woman who found a severed mouse head in a can of green beans if she pledges not to take legal action, but she's not biting. The letter from Allens Inc. of Siloam Springs, Ark., describes it as a "gesture of goodwill." Marianne Watson isn't interested.Apparently she doesn't want money. Or so she says. Instead she wants the company to recall all cans of…
Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2007.   Comments (7)

The Flight to Nowhere — Cranky Media Guy forwarded me this fascinating article about a new concept in travel. You pay your money, get on a plane, and then go nowhere. You just pretend that you're going somewhere. Meanwhile a stewardess serves you drinks and the "pilot" makes announcements such as "We will soon be passing through a zone of turbulence," and "We are about to begin our descent into Delhi." This concept is the idea of Indian entrepreneur Bahadur Chand Gupta, and it's proving quite popular. His…
Posted: Wed Oct 03, 2007.   Comments (8)

Hypnotist Robbers — A New Hampshire convenience store clerk claims that he was robbed. However, the thieves didn't use any weapons or threats. Instead, they used hypnosis and mind control to make the clerk not notice that they were taking more than $1000. First coast news reports: It started with a simple mind game. Think of a wild animal, they say, and we'll write down what's in your mind. but it escalates quickly to very personal information about a former girlfriend, and finally, says Patel, mind…
Posted: Tue Oct 02, 2007.   Comments (11)

Cursed Japanese Kleenex Commercial — A commercial for Kleenex that aired in Japan during the 1980s became the focus of an urban legend. Derek Bassett last year described the legend on his blog Mohora: So the story is this commercial for Kleenex tissues was shown on Japanese TV back in 1986 or so. It features an actress in a white dress sitting next to a child made up to look like a baby ogre. There is a really creepy song in a foreign language that when researched, is actually an old German folk song with the words “Die,…
Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007.   Comments (8)

Blue Peter Socksgate Scandal — For the second time in six months, the hosts of Blue Peter have had to apologize for deceiving their viewers. For Americans who don't know what Blue Peter is, it's a British children's show featuring always peppy presenters. It's been on the air for decades, and is like a TV institution over in Britain. I remember watching it as a kid when my family lived in London. The latest incident involves a cat named Cookie. The show had asked their viewers to vote on what to name the next Blue…
Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007.   Comments (3)

John Harvard Becomes Halo Master Chief — The statue of John Harvard in Harvard Yard is a frequent target of pranks, and recently it became a target once again. Students from MIT transformed John into the character "Master Chief" from the video game Halo 3. The MIT Tech explains: The back of the helmet, which is worn by the protagonist of the game, Master Chief, was labeled with “Master Chief in Training.” The statue was decorated with an assault rifle (bullet count of 2E), as well as a Beaver emblem on the right shoulder. I…
Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007.   Comments (2)

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