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Ex-cook pleads guilty to putting hair in steak
Posted: 24 June 2008 12:53 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Ex-cook pleads guilty to putting hair in steak


Jun 20, 7:00 PM (ET)


WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) - A former restaurant cook has pleaded guilty to a food-tampering charge alleging he inserted hairs in a steak before giving it to a dissatisfied customer. Ryan Kropp, 24, of West Bend, was fired along with another cook after the incident Feb. 23 at the Texas Roadhouse restaurant.

Kropp was charged in Washington County Circuit Court with a felony of placing foreign objects in edibles, carrying up to 3 1/2 years in prison.

After his guilty plea Thursday, Judge James Muehlbauer scheduled sentencing Aug. 12.

The criminal complaint said that when a manager asked a customer how his steak was, the customer said it was somewhat overdone, although he had almost finished eating it and refused an offer of a new steak.

But the manager insisted on having Kropp prepare a new steak the way the customer wanted it, medium rare, so that he could take it home.

The customer called the restaurant and police after finding hair as he was eating the steak the next day.

According to the complaint, a second kitchen worker told police Kropp had put a slit in the cooked steak and pushed something inside, then stated, “These are my pubes,” referring to pubic hair.

Kropp told police he put a few of his facial hairs on the steak, saying he was angry the customer sent the other steak back and thought he was “just trying to get free stuff,” the complaint said.

A phone number for Kropp had been disconnected when The Associated Press tried to reach him for comment Thursday night.

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Never tick off the cook where you have ordered food…Some of the stories I have heard would make one shudder! shock

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Posted: 24 June 2008 02:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yeah, but this customer didnt even really complain. The customer didnt even want a new steak. The manager insisted on getting it for him. I never complain. Unless it is something really wrong. My husband is an executive chef. He has worked in restaurants for years. I know not to be a bitch about anything.

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Posted: 24 June 2008 04:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yep. Only complain if something is obviously, demonstrably wrong with your order.

I remember having a ‘discussion’ with the manager of a Taco bell once, explaining that tomatoes should be red, a little yellow maybe, but brilliant green is right out… ... he didn’t understand why I was complaining.

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1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

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Posted: 24 June 2008 05:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I didn’t know cats ate tomatoes??

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Posted: 24 June 2008 05:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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gray - 24 June 2008 09:09 AM

I didn’t know cats ate tomatoes??

Only on those gordita-thingies, and then we generally leave whichever ones fall off it into the wrapping to their fate. We do not tolerate onions, though.

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1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

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Posted: 24 June 2008 01:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I dunno…I figured if I’m paying for something, I should be getting exactly what I asked for.  Not sort-of-almost what I asked for.

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Posted: 24 June 2008 08:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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If I order something and it’s not quite what I asked for but still good, I’ll tell the waiter so if he/she asks but not bother complaining or asking for it to be replaced.  I’d only do that if there was something actually making it inedible, or at least too horrible to be eaten voluntarily.  But if a steak is just somewhat overcooked, I’m not going to fuss about it.

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Posted: 24 June 2008 11:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I spend pretty much all of my “extra” income on dining out.  It’s really become one of my favorite things.  I’m extremely frugal in most other areas of my life (you’d be shocked to know how little I live on), but I am always kind and generous to the people who prepare and serve my food.

Heck, for me service is probably more important than the food anyway. 

I could count on one hand the number of times there was anything really wrong with my food anyway.  (And I can’t even think of a single example, so it’s probably been years.)

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Posted: 25 June 2008 10:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I’m the same way Joe when it comes to service. It is MOST DEFINATELY as important as the food served.  You can have a great menu, good food, and tasty drink concoctions, but if you have lousy service, it isn’t worth a penny.  All it will do is give one indigestion.

We don’t go out a lot, because we be poor folks, but when we do, I pay close attention to the service rendered.  I treat the servers, waiters, seaters and all like people and expect the same treatment from them.

If I run across an especially good bit of service, i make a point of asking for a survey card or the manager on duty and praise the behavior. (As well as leaving a proportionally bigger tip!) I make sure the person and their coworkers know WHY I was so pleased (ie what they did) and what it meant to me.  I figure this makes an impression on the people that kindness and respect can and is often rewarded! grin

If you don’t make an effort to let them know when they’ve done it RIGHT, often all you will get is the WRONG. grin

JMHO, for what it is worth! cheese

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“Always, I Do What Is Necessary” - Rissa Kerguelen
Go to my Blog. It’s lonely.

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