1 of 1
Mice infected with plague missing from lab
Posted: 16 September 2005 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3687
Joined  2005-02-09

NEWARK, New Jersey (AP)—Three mice infected with the bacteria responsible for bubonic plague apparently disappeared from a laboratory about two weeks ago, and authorities launched a search though health experts said there was scant public risk.
Read More….
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/09/15/missing.mice.ap/index.html

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 September 2005 09:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3687
Joined  2005-02-09

Remember…..only a small risk…..... rolleyes

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 September 2005 09:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  7682
Joined  2005-06-05

I read that story yesterday and that was definitely the part that caught my attention “scant risk to the public”.

The reasons listed were fairly legitimate, mice would die of disease, be eaten by predators etc. but I expected the reasons to include something about the disease not being able to spread to humans, they did not mention it because the disease can be spread to humans which in my opinion increases the public risk to something more than “scant”

You probably have a higher risk of contracting the Hantavirus then contracting The Black Death from a couple of missing lab mice but still, I think the risk has been portrayed as less than what it is.

Btw, the Hantavirus is contracted by inhaling dried deer mouse droppings…obviously they have to dry to the point where they disseminate into the air as dust particles. A 21 year old girl died of this disease in a town I was living in (Mammoth Lakes, CA.) back in 1990.

 Signature 

FOLLANSBEE, WV; Having been alerted to the coming apocalypse at a recent church service, 6-year-old Julie Strand decided she needed to live for today and immediately stuck a peanut M & M up her left nostril.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 September 2005 11:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  26044
Joined  2004-11-08

Bubonic plague still exists in the wild with sporadic outbreaks.  I doubt a few infected mice will add much to the risk of contracting it.  I remember reading somewhere that the current death rate is below 5%, and in the US is mostly found in southwestern states.

On a related note, I found this quite interesting.

http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2002/04/04-23-02tdc/04-23-02dscihealth-04.asp

 Signature 

Heaven must be really boring, if you think about it logically.
All the angels must be snoring.  Who could stand perfection for eternity?

Not me. - George Hrab

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 September 2005 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5071
Joined  2005-03-16

About 15 or so years ago, my hometown newspaper reported warnings, because the town was in the process of trying to kill of the rats at the dump as there were plague carrier rats there.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 September 2005 01:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  7682
Joined  2005-06-05
Charybdis - 16 September 2005 03:18 PM

Bubonic plague still exists in the wild with sporadic outbreaks.  I doubt a few infected mice will add much to the risk of contracting it.  I remember reading somewhere that the current death rate is below 5%, and in the US is mostly found in southwestern states.

On a related note, I found this quite interesting.

http://www.collegian.psu.edu/archive/2002/04/04-23-02tdc/04-23-02dscihealth-04.asp


oops, so much for my Black Death comment…interesting article though Chary smile

 Signature 

FOLLANSBEE, WV; Having been alerted to the coming apocalypse at a recent church service, 6-year-old Julie Strand decided she needed to live for today and immediately stuck a peanut M & M up her left nostril.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 September 2005 12:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9365
Joined  2005-01-23

There actually would be little risk to the public if the mice were infected with normal bubonic plague as it’s easily treated with antibiotics these days. The danger would be if they had been used to test the strain of antibiotic-resistant plague or pneumonic plague.
Plague outbreaks are still quite common these days, and it was only 11 years ago that there was a major outbreak in Surat. It’s not a middle ages disease like most people think.

 Signature 

The Middleman: (drinking milk) You know, that was some darn fine cow squirt.

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 1