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How 19-year-old activist Zack Kopplin is making life hell for Louisiana’s creationists
Posted: 16 January 2013 10:25 AM   [ Ignore ]
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For Zack Kopplin, it all started back in 2008 with the passing of the Louisiana Science Education Act. The bill made it considerably easier for teachers to introduce creationist textbooks into the classroom. Outraged, he wrote a research paper about it for a high school English class. Nearly five years later, the 19-year-old Kopplin has become one of the fiercest — and most feared — advocates for education reform in Louisiana. We recently spoke to him to learn more about how he’s making a difference.

Kopplin, who is studying history at Rice University, had good reason to be upset after the passing of the LSEA — an insidious piece of legislation that allows teachers to bring in their own supplemental materials when discussing politically controversial topics like evolution or climate change. Soon after the act was passed, some of his teachers began to not just supplement existing texts, but to rid the classroom of established science books altogether. It was during the process to adopt a new life science textbook in 2010 that creationists barraged Louisiana’s State Board of Education with complaints about the evidence-based science texts. Suddenly, it appeared that they were going to be successful in throwing out science textbooks.

“This was a pivotal moment for me,” Kopplin told io9. “I had always been a shy kid and had never spoken out before — I found myself speaking at a meeting of an advisory committee to the State Board of Education and urging them to adopt good science textbooks — and we won.” The LSEA still stood, but at least the science books could stay.

No one was more surprised of his becoming a science advocate than Kopplin himself. In fact, after writing his English paper in 2008 — when he was just 14-years-old — he assumed that someone else would publicly take on the law. But no one did.

“I didn’t expect it to be me,” he said. “By my senior year though, I realized that no one was going to take on the law, so for my high school senior project I decided to get a repeal bill.”

Indeed, it was the ensuing coverage of the science textbook adoption issue that launched Kopplin as an activist. It also gave him the confidence to start the campaign to repeal the LSEA.

Encouraged by Barbara Forrest, a philosophy professor at Southeastern Louisiana University — and a staunch critic of intelligent design and the Discovery Institute — Kopplin decided to write a letter that could be signed by Nobel laureate scientists in support of the repeal. To that end, he contacted Sir Harry Kroto, a British chemist who shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley. Kroto helped him to draft the letter — one that has now been signed by 78 Nobel laureates.

In addition, Kopplin has introduced two bills to repeal the LSEA, both of which have been sponsored by State Senator Karen Carter Peterson. He plans on producing a third bill later this spring. And along with the Nobel laureates, he has the support of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), New Orleans City Council, and many others.

But as the early results of his efforts have shown, it’s not going to be an easy battle.

“We’ve had gains over the last few years,” he says, “But our first attempt to repeal the LSEA was defeated 5-1 in committee, and in our second attempt we lost 2-1.” Kopplin is hoping to get out of committee this year.

He also has his eyes set on vouchers. After an Alternet story came out about a school in the Louisiana voucher program teaching that the Loch Ness Monster was real and disproved evolution, Kopplin looked deeper into the program and found that this wasn’t just one school, but at least 19 other schools, too.

School vouchers, he argues, unconstitutionally fund the teaching of creationism because many of the schools in these programs are private fundamentalist religious schools who are teaching creationism.

“These schools have every right to teach whatever they want — no matter how much I disagree with it — as long as they are fully private,” he says. “But when they take public money through vouchers, these schools need to be accountable to the public in the same way that public schools are and they must abide by the same rules.” Kopplin is hoping for more transparency in these programs so the public can see what is being taught with taxpayers’ money.
Facing opposition

His efforts, needless to say, have not gone unnoticed — particularly by his opponents. He’s been called the Anti-Christ, a stooge of “godless liberal college professors,” and was even accused of causing Hurricane Katrina. Kopplin cooly brushes these incidents aside, saying they’re just silly distractions.

But some of the most aggressive broadsides, he says, have come from state legislators.

...

Full Story.

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Posted: 16 January 2013 11:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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There is a huge difference between public schools not affiliated with any political party OR any religious group and teaching in a school back by a non-profit religious entity.  In the latter religious schools, parents, students and even society expects a particular ‘doctrine’ to be expressed (and basically paid for by that particular institution).  In public schools it’s society as a whole who funds so there should be ONLY the ideal of teaching students to think for themselves.

If classes in politics are going to be addressed in public schools, the teacher may encourage students to supplement, as part of debate, wide political platform ideals published by news media and even history.  But certainly it is NEVER up to any teacher to lay groundwork on their own for specific individual political agendas.

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SilentTone: hulitoons blog of just plain silliness?
UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are.)”  So, I AM because WE are

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Posted: 17 January 2013 06:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Good on him. Schools should only be allowed to have religion present in education on their existence and ideally how there is no proof that anything said in religious texts are true. Alas, religion will not go away as too many people defend the right for people to have their beliefs (belief equalling no evidence), even though it equates to a form of mental illness in my view.

If someone called me godless I would take it as a compliment.

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Posted: 17 January 2013 06:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Then there are Christians like me, who do not believe in creationism. If I ever have children I’m seriously thinking of not sending them to any kind of Christian group until they are old enough to make their own decisions. I’m sad to say I have a distrust of any kind of Christian Children’s Ministry.

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Posted: 19 January 2013 10:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Peter I think a lot of parents have begun that approach.  In truth, I believe that Theology should be an elective course once a child is old enough.  Since theology itself focuses on a single deity, and the study of all religions surrounding that single deity, it is, in itself, a religious platform.  However, it’s an interesting one that I think can be illuminating:  http://en.wiki.org/wiki/Theology

........ theologia, as “reasoning or discussion concerning the Deity”;[2] Richard Hooker defined “theology” in English as “the science of things divine”.[3] The term can, however, be used for a variety of different disciplines or forms of discourse.[4] Theologians use various forms of analysis and argument (philosophical, ethnographic, historical, spiritual and others) to help understand, explain, test, critique, defend or promote any of myriad religious topics.

Since human laws and guidelines have always been formulated surrounding religious/superstitious beliefs from either a single or multiple deity(ies), those ideas have caused societies to evolve, remain stagnant, or even de-evolve according to specific first and then maltreated interpretations. 

 

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SilentTone: hulitoons blog of just plain silliness?
UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are.)”  So, I AM because WE are

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