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Chinese amphibious dragons
Posted: 30 June 2012 02:38 PM   [ Ignore ]
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http://cryptozoologynews.blogspot.com/2010/05/real-dragon-fossils-on-display-in-china.html

Real Dragon Fossils on Display in China

Some fossils, named the “China dragon fossils”, were recently exhibited in the Xinwei Ancient Life Fossils Museum in Anshun, Guizhou.

When archeologists first stripped the clay off the fossil, they found the dragon had a pair of horns above its head and the shape of the dragon was very like the legendary animal often described in books and stories.

Dragons have often appeared in Chinese legends. The dragon with two horns on its head is regarded as a totem. The totem was first invented by Chinese ancestors and worshipped by the Chinese people. Therefore Chinese people are also called the “descendents of the dragon”.

For a long time, scientists thought that the dragon was a fictional animal existing only in stories.

The dragon fossil was found in Guanling County, Anshun City, in 1996, and has been kept in a good condition. It is measured 7.6 meters long. Its head is 76 centimeters long and the neck is 54 centimeters long. The body is 2.7 meters in length and 68 centimeters in width, and the tail is 3.7 meters long.

The dragon’s head is in a triangle shape. Its mouth is 43 centimeters long. The widest part of the head is 32 centimeters long. The horns project from the widest part of the head, and are symmetrical and 27 centimeters long. They are a little bit curved and tilted, which makes the fossil look very much like the legendary dragon.

The China dragon was a reptile animal living in the ocean in Triassic Period about 200 million years ago. It was an amphibian. It spent most of its time living in water, although sometimes it walked on land. It also laid eggs on land. The animal lived on fish and small reptile animals.

This is the first time that China found a dragon fossil with a pair of horns. Its discovery provides some evidence to prove that dragons might really have horns. The fossil provides important scientific information for people to trace the origin of the Chinese legendary dragon.

Sadly, I’m pretty sure that this story belongs in this section of the MoH Forum.

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Posted: 30 June 2012 03:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Well, it says the “China dragon was a reptile” and then, “It was an amphibian,” so we have errors right up front. As one who is intimately familiar with Triassic preservation, I can assure you that that kind of skin fossilization would make more than the Crypto-zoology News. Big reptile skulls are full of holes to lighten them up and provide muscle attachments, or, as in the turtles, have a large keel at the back for the jaw muscles. While amphibian skulls from this period are well preserved, their skeletons are not (mostly cartilage). The “specimen” provided appears to be a model of an artists interpretation of a dragon fossil. There are too many anatomical and paleontological problems to treat this as real. Bummer! I would have liked a real dragon skeleton.

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Posted: 30 June 2012 03:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Well, I think that picture was whatever the article writer could come up with on an article for ‘dragon’. Chinese dragons lack wings, you will recall. Still, some extra vertabrae and horns added to a prehistoric crocodile skeleton and boom, dragon.

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Posted: 30 June 2012 08:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Burkenhare - 30 June 2012 03:42 PM

Well, it says the “China dragon was a reptile” and then, “It was an amphibian,” so we have errors right up front.

To give them the benefit of the doubt, “amphibian” can mean a member of a specific taxonomic group (kingdom Animalia, phylum Chordata, class Amphibia), or it can mean anything that is equally at home on land and in the water (frogs, crabs, penguins, Cthulhu, Beriev A-40, etc.).  They could have been meaning the latter.

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Posted: 30 June 2012 11:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Robin Bobcat - 30 June 2012 03:59 PM

Well, I think that picture was whatever the article writer could come up with on an article for ‘dragon’. Chinese dragons lack wings, you will recall. Still, some extra vertabrae and horns added to a prehistoric crocodile skeleton and boom, dragon.

Yeah, that was my first thought when I saw the picture - not a Chinese dragon at all!

Accipiter - 30 June 2012 08:28 PM
Burkenhare - 30 June 2012 03:42 PM

Well, it says the “China dragon was a reptile” and then, “It was an amphibian,” so we have errors right up front.

To give them the benefit of the doubt, “amphibian” can mean a member of a specific taxonomic group (kingdom Animalia, phylum Chordata, class Amphibia), or it can mean anything that is equally at home on land and in the water (frogs, crabs, penguins, Cthulhu, Beriev A-40, etc.).  They could have been meaning the latter.

So, they should’ve more accurately called it amphibious, not amphibian?

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Posted: 01 July 2012 12:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The dragon in the photo reminds me of the TV show Dragons: A Fantasy Made Real. It’s probably is a stock dragon photo from that show to accompany the article. I wonder what the actual exhibit looks like?

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Posted: 01 July 2012 03:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Heh, I was just looking that up!

http://dragonsinn.net/p-day_icedragon.htm

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Posted: 13 July 2012 04:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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The one comment on that article is cracking me up.

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