1 of 1
Curse of Tutankhamun may have been work of Satanist killer
Posted: 09 November 2011 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5152
Joined  2005-01-27

Six mysterious London deaths famously attributed to the ‘Curse of Tutankhamun’ were actually murders by notorious Satanist Aleister Crowley, a historian claims in a new book.

Incredible parallels between Crowley and Jack the Ripper have also been discovered during research by historian Mark Beynon.

Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, London was gripped by the mythical curse of Tutankhamun, the Egyptian boy-king, whose tomb was uncovered by British archaeologist Howard Carter.

More than 20 people linked to the opening of the pharaoh’s burial chamber in Luxor in 1923 bizarrely died over the following years - six of them in the capital.

Victims included Carter’s personal secretary Captain Richard Bethell, who was found dead in his bed from suspected smothering at an exclusive Mayfair club.

Bethell’s father Lord Westbury then plunged seven floors to his death from his St James’s apartment, where he reportedly kept tomb artefacts gifted by his son.

And Aubrey Herbert, half-brother of Carter’s financial backer Lord Carnarvon, also died suspiciously in a Park Lane hospital shortly after visiting Luxor.

At the time, a frenzied Press blamed the ‘Curse of Tutankhamun’ for the deaths and speculated on the supernatural powers of the ancient Egyptians.

But Mr Beynon has now drawn on previously unpublished evidence to conclude the deaths were all ritualistic killings masterminded by Crowley, an occultist dubbed “the wickedest man in the world”.

After unique analysis of Crowley’s diaries, essays and books and inquest reports, the armchair detective argues that he was a Jack the Ripper-obsessed copycat killer.

Crowley, who called himself ‘The Great Beast’, apparently had his own motives to tarnish the legacy of Carter’s legendary discovery.

The gods and goddesses of Crowley’s own religious philosophy, Thelema, were mainly drawn from ancient Egyptian religion.

He believed himself to be a prophet of a new age of personal liberty, controlled by the ancient Egyptian god Horus.

It is likely that he would have found Carter’s excavation sacrilegious and wanted revenge, according to Mr Beynon.

In his new book ‘London’s Curse: Murder, Black Magic and Tutankhamun in the 1920s West End’, published this week by The History Press, Mr Beynon pins seven deaths on Crowley, six of which took place in London:

- Raoul Loveday (16 February 1923): the 23-year-old Oxford undergraduate was a follower of Crowley’s cult at a Sicilian abbey. He died on the same day at the very hour of Carter’s much-publicised opening of Tutankhamun’s burial chamber. He died after drinking the blood of a cat sacrificed in one of Crowley’s rituals and Mr Beynon argues that he was deliberately poisoned.

- Prince Ali Kamel Fahmy Bey (10 July 1923): a 23-year-old Egyptian prince shot dead by his French wife of six months, Marie-Marguerite, in London’s Savoy Hotel shortly after he was photographed visiting the tomb. Mr Beynon says that Crowley and Marie-Marguerite had been lovers in Paris. She was working as a hostess at the Folies Bergère and he was a regular patron at the same venue. He suggests that Crowley put her up to the shooting.

- Aubrey Herbert (23 September 1923): shortly after Marie-Marguerite’s acquittal, Aubrey Herbert, the half-brother of Lord Carnarvon, died of blood poisoning after a routine dental operation went suspiciously wrong at his private hospital in Park Lane. He had only recently returned from his own trip to Luxor. Mr Beynon speculates that Crowley was behind the death and may again have used Marie-Marguerite to do his dirty work.

- Captain Richard Bethell (15 November 1929): Howard Carter’s 46-year-old personal secretary was found dead in his bed at Mayfair’s exclusive Bath Club. Bethell was said to have been in perfect health. It was initially thought that he died of a heart attack but his symptoms raised suspicion that he was smothered to death as he slept. Crowley had only recently returned to London and was often a guest of novelist W. Somerset Maugham at the club.

- Lord Westbury (20 February 1930): Bethell’s father, Lord Westbury, 77, was believed to have thrown himself off his seventh floor St James’s apartment. But Mr Beynon found that it was practically impossible for an elderly man to have climbed out onto the window ledge and suggests that Crowley threw him off.

- Edgar Steele (24 February 1930): only four days later, Edgar Steele, 57, who was in charge of handling the tomb artefacts at London’s British Museum, died at St Thomas’ Hospital after a minor stomach operation. Mr Beynon speculates that Crowley was behind the death.

- Sir Ernest Wallis Budge (23 November 1934): A former Keeper in the British Museum’s Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, he was found dead in his bed in Bloomsbury aged 77. A friend of Lord Carnarvon, he had been responsible for displaying the artefacts from Luxor. Mr Beynon says there is evidence that Budge and Crowley were associates on the London occult scene.

Crowley, who was born into a wealthy upper class family in 1875, had a controversial doctrine for life of ‘Do What Thou Wilt’.

The bisexual heroin addict gained notoriety for advocating sexual promiscuity and prostitution and was dubbed ‘the wickedest man in the world’ by the Press.

Mr Beynon paints a picture of a dangerous schizophrenic known to have murdered his servants in India.

Crowley never mentions the deaths in his diaries but often wrote that his mood had “lifted” the day after them.

He was obsessed with Jack the Ripper, writing numerous essays and poems about him.

He socialised with Ripper suspect Walter Sickert and Mr Beynon argues that Crowley used the Ripper’s killing spree as inspiration for his own efforts years later.

CONTINUED BELOW

 Signature 


“By the sweat on our brows, and the strengths of our backs…Gentlemen. Hoist the Colours! And you, madam, I warn you, I know the entire Geneva Convention by heart!”
Trust me.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 November 2011 02:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5152
Joined  2005-01-27

Crowley wrote in his diaries that he believed the locations of five of the Ripper’s murders in Whitechapel in 1888 formed a pentagram - an important star-shaped symbol in Satanism.

Mr Beynon claims that the locations of five of Crowley’s ‘murders’ form a copycat pentagram.

Crowley believed that the Ripper’s murders had afforded him special powers, including invisibility.

Mr Beynon says that he thought his murders would also render him invisible.

To test his theory, he famously walked through London’s Café Royal restaurant ridiculously dressed in a mustard-coloured cloak adorned with occultist symbols.

When customers fell silent and were too perturbed to speak to him, he assumed they could not see him.

Outlining his macabre theory, Mr Beynon said: “When I researched these deaths, Crowley’s name popped up again and again.

“There is plenty of circumstantial evidence linking him to all the deaths and his diaries and books are riddled with clues linking him to these crimes.

“I have just put all the pieces of the jigsaw together.

“So much of Crowley’s belief system was steeped in ancient Egypt.

“He would have seen the opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb as desecration.

“This was a man given to extensive world travel and yet we know he was in London when at least four of the six deaths occurred.”

He added: “I hope the book will appeal to anyone with an interest in crime or London history.

“I was fascinated researching London in the 20s and 30s.

“On the surface, it was very glitzy and glamorous but there was a dark underbelly that provided the ideal stage for this story.

“Everyone was obsessed with the supposed Curse of Tutankhamun striking down high society victims.

“But until now, no-one has ever realised that they may well have been murdered.”

Source


Pictured: Aleister Crowley

 Signature 


“By the sweat on our brows, and the strengths of our backs…Gentlemen. Hoist the Colours! And you, madam, I warn you, I know the entire Geneva Convention by heart!”
Trust me.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 November 2011 03:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Senior Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  534
Joined  2009-08-10

I was reading about Crowley recently and it would seem that he wasn’t the type to harm anyone, he just tried to shock people to stir up controversey. He also travelled a lot, so it seems unlikely that he would have been in the same country as some of these people at the time of their death and I suspect this book is just a means to make money from a popular character. I have no idea how Raoul Loveday’s death could have anything to do with the opening of a tomb in a day where fast communication barely existed.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 November 2011 03:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6932
Joined  2005-10-21

yeah.. sounds to me like another ‘let’s speculate wildly about some popular but mysterious long-past event and present it as fact to make money’ thing. *sigh*

 Signature 

1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2011 01:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
New Member
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2011-11-14

  There are sufficient grounds to assume that the “discovery” of the king Tut’s tomb was an elaborate hoax.
Howard Carter with his team found the tomb filled with treasures and not the empty one. Beginners luck ? I think not.
The obvious explanation is that they dug the tomb themselves and put the “ancient artifacts” inside. Don’t ask me where they got the mummy.
There is no shortage of them in Egypt. So they locked the tomb, artistically covered the entrance with sand and some stones, invited reporters and cameramen.
Once all the necessary preparations have been made, the discovery was not long to wait…

  In the following years persons who participated in the expedition were killed as dangerous witnesses. So the myth of the curse originated.
Or may be the story of King Tut’s Curse was invented to put the investigators “on the wrong track”.  So no one ever discussed the posibility of a huge scientific fraud…

  Keeping in mind the possibility of Nefertiti bust being a fake i see absolutely no difficulty in Tut’s mask being a fake too.

Relics from Tutankhamun’s tomb are among the most traveled artifacts in the world

The tomb itself is located 2-3 meters below the ground. Not so deep for an authentic egyptian burial chamber.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2011 03:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6932
Joined  2005-10-21

Hookay.. where to begin on this…

First off: It’d be one HECK of an expensive hoax. The amount of money involved to pull it off would far, FAR outweigh any fame garnered from finding the tomb. That mask? SOLID. GOLD. 24 pounds of it. The inner sarcophagus? ALSO. SOLID. GOLD. 240 pounds of gold there. And yes, they are real gold, and yes they are solid. There’s tests that can be done easily to prove both, that have been known - amusingly - since the times of the ancient egyptians. That’s not counting the dozens of other knick-knacks, bric-brac, and tchochkes that a young king needs in the afterlife, much less the treasury.

Second: This wasn’t some ‘quick photo-op’. Every inch of every object was meticulously recorded. It took several years to carefully extract every object from the tomb. If you’re pulling a hoax, the last thing you want is continued scrutiny. Mind you, only one reporter was present for the initial opening. If you want to impress people, you get a lot of press to show up.

Third: The small, shallow tomb was likely meant for someone else, as apparently nobody expected their 18 year old boy-king to die suddenly, before his more elaborate tomb could be constructed. This is also why it wasn’t looted along with the other royal tombs. Oh, wait, it was. At least twice. For all the jewelry and baubles they found, there was apparently a lot more in there originally.

Fourth: You can’t fake the body. He’s been determined to have been a member of the royal family, with some of the lovely inbred features of the line. This is both from the physical corpse itself and from more recent DNA. A hoaxer in the 1920s would have NO idea DNA even existed, so the odds of their getting ahold of a royal mummy (especially one who matched the descriptions given on various inscriptions) would be shockingly remote.

Fifth: All the artifacts are accurate. There were a LOT of items moved out of that tomb, and ALL of them are consistent. You can fake one or two items reliably, maybe three or four if nobody’s paying attention, but hundreds of objects? NOT happening. Bear in mind that these are some of the most examined artifacts in the world. If any of them were stamped ‘made in china’, we’d have known by now. Also the hundreds of inscriptions and suchnot are all 100% accurate, which would have required a phenomenal amount of knowledge. Even modern scholars would be hard-pressed to make something that good.

I can keep going, if you like. Carter’s exploration of the tombs is one of the most documented digs ever known.

If you want to claim that it’s a conspiracy, go right ahead. Just bear in mind that such an elaborate conspiracy would be utterly insane. The scope would be tremendous, spanning many decades and many, many countries (many of whom don’t/didn’t like one another and would gleefully expose such shenanegains), and for what? A tomb of a long-dead king? What advantage gained from that much effort?

Yeah. Occam’s Razor is sharp today.

 Signature 

1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 November 2011 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5152
Joined  2005-01-27

That´s one of those tiny little things with all conspiracies. To pull it off is always more expensive than the real thing.

 Signature 


“By the sweat on our brows, and the strengths of our backs…Gentlemen. Hoist the Colours! And you, madam, I warn you, I know the entire Geneva Convention by heart!”
Trust me.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 December 2011 08:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  61098
Joined  2005-04-14
dinosaur_denier - 15 November 2011 01:14 AM

Howard Carter with his team found the tomb filled with treasures and not the empty one. Beginners luck ? I think not.

I think not, too.  After all, Howard Carter had been working on Egyptian excavations for 31 years, had been working on excavations for Lord Carnarvon for 14 years, and had been excavating in the Valley of the Kings for 8 years.  So it’s less a case of “beginner’s luck” and more a case of “seasoned expert’s long years of hard work paying off luck”.

The obvious explanation is that they dug the tomb themselves and put the “ancient artifacts” inside.

No, the obvious explanation is that they found a tomb that hadn’t been stripped of everything by robbers.

The explanation that they dug out by hand a large tomb without disturbing any of the many other archaeological sites right on top of it (there are other tombs all over next to this one, and some old buildings literally right on top of it), cut and arranged the stone in a manner consistent with Tutankhamun’s time period, painted it all up in a manner consistent with Tutankhamun’s time period, stocked it up with an incredibly valuable treasure all of which consistent with Tutankhamun’s time period, and managed to do so in such a way that even modern forensics techniques can’t detect any flaws with, and managed to do it all in total secrecy even amongst the native workers, the people who they bought the grave goods from, and so on. . .that explanation is a bit far from obvious.

Don’t ask me where they got the mummy.  There is no shortage of them in Egypt.

Strange how they would just coincidentally have managed to find Tutankhamun’s actual mummy for the job. . .

In the following years persons who participated in the expedition were killed as dangerous witnesses. So the myth of the curse originated.
Or may be the story of King Tut’s Curse was invented to put the investigators “on the wrong track”.

Ummm. . .seeing as how Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter would have been the people who had arranged and funded the whole fraud and would have been the main people to benefit from it, and that they are two of the main people supposedly killed by the curse, it’s a little hard to believe that they would have arranged to have themselves murdered to prevent their secret from getting out.

So no one ever discussed the posibility of a huge scientific fraud…

Aside from, y’know, all the countless tests and investigations that have been made on the tomb and its contents.

The tomb itself is located 2-3 meters below the ground. Not so deep for an authentic egyptian burial chamber.

Sorry, but that comment is total nonsense.  Tutankhamun’s tomb is surrounded by many other tombs of similar depth.  Plus, many Egyptians were entombed above ground, in mastabas.  There was no carefully-prescribed depth of burial.

 Signature 

“If any man wish to write in a clear style, let him be first clear in his thoughts.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 December 2011 03:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5152
Joined  2005-01-27

Don´t forget the Egyptians in those days had help from Aliens.
So it is entirely possible and plausable they pulled of the hoax burial site.

 Signature 


“By the sweat on our brows, and the strengths of our backs…Gentlemen. Hoist the Colours! And you, madam, I warn you, I know the entire Geneva Convention by heart!”
Trust me.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 December 2011 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
New Member
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2011-12-13

This allegation against Crowley is simply nonsense. Learn the complete truth here:

http://www.saff.ukhq.co.uk/crowleybollocks.htm

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 December 2011 04:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Five Star Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  61098
Joined  2005-04-14
SWAL - 13 December 2011 02:17 PM

This allegation against Crowley is simply nonsense.

If nothing else, the claim that Crowley based the supposed murders on Jack the Ripper is rather silly, seeing as how the only similarity would be that people were killed.

Totally different types of victims, totally different methods, totally different everything other than the general location.

That’s totally overlooking the minor matter that most of the people had little or nothing to do with the excavation of Tutankhamun’s tomb, while most people who were directly involved were fine.

 Signature 

“If any man wish to write in a clear style, let him be first clear in his thoughts.”

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 1