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Siberian Valley of Death - Tunguska and underground complexes
Posted: 16 July 2011 08:32 PM   [ Ignore ]
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by Dr Valery Uvarov
Department N13 - National Security Academy - St Petersburg - Russia
Extracted from Nexus Magazine, Volume 12, Number 2
February - March 2005
Evidence and eyewitness testimony suggest the 1908 Tunguska meteorite was destroyed by intelligently guided plasma “terminator spheres” which utilized a technology that could compensate for explosive forces.

- Heading of the belowmentioned website.

Hello.

It’s 3a.m. over here, so excuse my grammar, but I thought some of you might find the following site interesting:

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/esp_ciencia_tunguska09.htm#top

Personally I’ve only read about half the material in there. The oponymous Valley of Death repeatedly mentioned on the site, doesn’t appear to have a wikipedia page and I haven’t conducted a Google search on the matter yet.

So far the site appears to claim, that:

*there’s an area in Siberia feared by locals, containing many out-of-place artefacts - huge metal ,,cauldrons’’ with only the rim still visible and underground rooms amongst other things
*people who stayed near these artefacts for extended amounts of time came down with what sounds like radiation sickness
*local myths speak of shafts in the ground, colums of fire, mushroom clouds, explosions and radiation poisonings happening around the area every few centuries
*the local villages were warned of the Tunguska incident beforehand by shamans travelling from village to village
*during the Tunguska incident witnesses saw multiple balls of fire, coming from different directions and heading to the same place

And concludes, apparently, that the Valley of Death is home to an underground complex created by an unknown civilization to destroy meteors - acting as a kind of Stargate’ish hidden defense system for our planet

Personally it doesn’t sound like one of those crackpot-sites, since it’s written in a dry style and offers a lot of dates and witness accounts. On the other hand, many of the claims beg for a [citation needed] sign, and even if the source has been cited it would be difficult, if not impossible, to confirm it. I’m fascinated by paranormal and cryptozoology, plus Tunguska isn’t really that far from my home (well, there’s only one national border between us, that has to count, doesn’t it?) so I found the site of interest, but I thought I’d post the link here for your sceptics to gnaw on.

In the meantime I’ll continue reading it and report back if I find anything else of interest.

EDIT: Alright, I’ve skimmed through the rest of the site and the theory seems indeed outlandish. It’s mostly unverifiable witness accounts. A brief search for Valley of Death tried to redirect me to Death Valley, but Valery Uvarov seems to have some websites dedicated to him.

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Posted: 16 July 2011 10:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yeah, I do have one or two doubts about the whole thing.  The way in which every single observation of odd items is at least third-hand, for example.  I’ll have to see if I can find some copies of the sources the guy cites.

Also, while the place is certainly out-of-the-way, it’s hardly untrammeled wilderness.  What’s just about the largest and busiest mine in the world is being operated in the general area, and there are a number of other large works that are ongoing or have gone on there.  And in the past half century there has been a lot of concentration on Stone Age and Bronze Age research in the region, especially along the river valleys.  And then there were the government nuclear weapons tests in the area; they would have been going all over the place around there with helicopters and other vehicles carrying radiation detectors.  It seems a bit unlikely that after all of that, we only have a few reports of reports of people saying that they knew somebody who once know somebody who saw something.

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Posted: 17 July 2011 06:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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One good thing came out of it - I got a marvellous new idea for my comic book.

I’m actually more worried about the impracticality of this complex. Why build just one of them (budget cuts?) and in such an inconvenient place? What’s the point of a meteor protection that only protects (and poisons) the local area? I mean, if it were real, and as old as claimed, then it’s unable to even locate meteors that hit a mere 3000 kilometres away! Otherwise there would be no Kaali crater - it would have been shot to pieces mid-air by terminator plasma beams. Which renders the complex near useless, because not all meteors fall in Siberia - a rock could still plummet into the Gulf of Mexico and take the human race with it.

I was going to say that The Olonkho Epic mentioned on the site sounded like no folk myth I’ve ever heard of, but apparently the Olonko is a real heroic epic tale of the Sakha people living in the general region [wikipedia] so I figure the verses quoted are real as well. Even so, folk songs are prone to exaggerations and even Wikipedia says that the Olonkho has many different versions in existence. As much as I know the verses could have been mis-translated to fit the reporters agenda. I believe they’ve been re-translated atleast twice - from sakha local language to russian to english, so “mistakes” are easy to make. The most logical theory for me is, that the verses about smoke and explosions were added after the locals heard or witnessed a nuclear testing some time during the 20th century. As much as I know about legends travelling by word of mouth - people rarely let the truth get in the way of a good story. One can not say for sure what they were thinking before consulting a folklorist or a sakhan wiseman.

There’s one minor thing I have to disagree with you, Accipiter. Though Siberia is hardly undisturbed wilderness it’s still one of the largest forest masses in the world. There’s more river-valleys than an archeologist can study in his lifetime and there are many places that no outsider has ever set their foot on. It’s true what he says - “It must be said that in that locality you can pass within 10 paces of something and not notice it, so earlier discoveries have been pure luck.” It’s just that…I have a hard trouble believing that an ancient earth protection system is part of the secrets Siberia is holding. So I guess I’m still on the sceptic side. Especially since due to modern technology you don’t HAVE to go within 10 paces of something to find it, which brings me to my final pondering -

I can’t help but to wonder that if such artefacts were to exist, shouldn’t they be visible by satellite? We are talking about metal cauldrons surrounded by visibly different foliage and apparently bottomless holes with signs of radiation poisoning all around. It sounds almost as if they should be seen from Google Earth. And if the last incident happened in 2002, then I believe atleast one satellite should have registered the unexplainable ray of light. I’d like to have a chance to meet Dr. Uvarov personally to ask him about this. See what he’d answer. Fill in some plot holes. For some reason I doubt that he wrote this piece with malicious intents in mind. It’s a fascinating theory, even on a fictional level.

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Posted: 17 July 2011 11:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Cliodna - 17 July 2011 10:40 AM

Why. . .in such an inconvenient place? What’s the point of a meteor protection that only. . .poisons the local area?

That part actually would possibly make some sense.

“Hey, I just came up with a new and amazing system to protect us from meteors!”

“Oh?  Hmmm. . .looks like it might kill us all, though, through radiation poisoning.”

“Right, let’s build a test system somewhere out-of-the-way and see how that goes!”

It being a test system would account for it being in an inconvenient place, and also for it being limited in scope and ability.

The most logical theory for me is, that the verses about smoke and explosions were added after the locals heard or witnessed a nuclear testing some time during the 20th century.

Or maybe they were describing some of the volcanic activity from Kamchatka or thereabout, and the stories just got sort of vague on exactly where the events were happening.  That sort of thing happens fairly often, with tales from one area being adopted and adapted by people of another area.

There’s one minor thing I have to disagree with you, Accipiter. Though Siberia is hardly undisturbed wilderness it’s still one of the largest forest masses in the world. There’s more river-valleys than an archeologist can study in his lifetime and there are many places that no outsider has ever set their foot on. It’s true what he says - “It must be said that in that locality you can pass within 10 paces of something and not notice it, so earlier discoveries have been pure luck.”

Oh, I have no doubt that there can be a huge amount hidden out there; that’s what the various Russian governments counted on so often, for example, with all sorts of secret camps and facilities.  But this particular part of Siberia is one of the less untraveled sections, with a relatively large number of visitors.  And it just seems strange that even with that, it’s always friend-of-a-friend reports.

And if the last incident happened in 2002, then I believe atleast one satellite should have registered the unexplainable ray of light.

There are satellites that specifically watch for flashes of light coming from the Earth’s surface, as well as all sorts of others that look at the planet for various other reasons.  Plus all sorts of aircraft that fly around watching things.

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Posted: 18 July 2011 08:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I tried looking at this area on Google Earth. Strangeley enough there are a lot of blurred out areas. I am surprised that people are not investigating this area. I’m sure with the right equipment we could uncover some crazy things.

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Posted: 18 July 2011 08:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I think it’s blurred out because it’s in the middle of nowhere and the only image they have are low-rez sat images. Even after the fall of the iron curtain, Russia isn’t too keen on sharing detailed photos of its countryside.

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