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Predictably Irrational
Posted: 01 May 2011 10:28 AM   [ Ignore ]
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In my second year at university I stumbled across Dan Ariely and his videos on the subject on being Predictably Irrational. There is a list of his videos here.

One video that would seem relevant to one or two threads on the MOH Forums would be the one titled “Chapter 9: The effect of expectations”. I’m thinking about discussions on the MOH forums about how people filter their experiences of reality in their mind based on their own beliefs.

He’s also got a Youtube Channel under the username danariely.

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Posted: 01 May 2011 10:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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They are talking about Confirmation Bias… wink

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Confirmation bias (also called confirmatory bias or myside bias) is a tendency for people to favor information that confirms their preconceptions or hypotheses regardless of whether the information is true.[Note 1][1] As a result, people gather evidence and recall information from memory selectively, and interpret it in a biased way. The biases appear in particular for emotionally significant issues and for established beliefs. For example, in reading about gun control, people usually prefer sources that affirm their existing attitudes. They also tend to interpret ambiguous evidence as supporting their existing position. Biased search, interpretation and/or recall have been invoked to explain attitude polarization (when a disagreement becomes more extreme even though the different parties are exposed to the same evidence), belief perseverance (when beliefs persist after the evidence for them is shown to be false), the irrational primacy effect (a stronger weighting for data encountered early in an arbitrary series) and illusory correlation (in which people falsely perceive an association between two events or situations).

A series of experiments in the 1960s suggested that people are biased towards confirming their existing beliefs. Later work explained these results in terms of a tendency to test ideas in a one-sided way, focusing on one possibility and ignoring alternatives. In combination with other effects, this strategy can bias the conclusions that are reached. Explanations for the observed biases include wishful thinking and the limited human capacity to process information. Another proposal is that people show confirmation bias because they are pragmatically assessing the costs of being wrong, rather than investigating in a neutral, scientific way.

Confirmation biases contribute to overconfidence in personal beliefs and can maintain or strengthen beliefs in the face of contrary evidence. Hence they can lead to disastrous decisions, especially in organizational, military, political and social contexts.

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Posted: 01 May 2011 11:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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OK. Maybe I misunderstood. Although I would’ve thought the video I mentioned is along similar lines (sorry, I’m feeling a bit tired right now).

Although I’m sure some people here would still like to watch the videos.

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