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eBooks vs real books
Posted: 28 March 2011 04:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Same with an ebook, honestly. E-ink doesn’t need to ‘turn off’ to save power and can go months of page-flipping, and most readers are surprisingly durable. Dropping it is still out, but if you’ve got back pockets that can hold the collected works of Shakespear, Robert Jordan, and the Encyclopedia Brittanica, a diet may be in order.

One company in the UK is looking into making ‘flipback’ books. Thinner pages, with the text reading parallel to the spine. http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/mar/20/could-this-kill-kindle

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Posted: 28 March 2011 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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gray - 28 March 2011 01:38 AM

Give me a paper book any time.  It won’t care if I leave it open for 3 days, drop it on the floor, stuff it in my back pocket or take it on a backwoods camping trip.

How does it cope with fire or flood? wink

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Posted: 28 March 2011 04:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Mr R - 28 March 2011 08:29 AM
gray - 28 March 2011 01:38 AM

Give me a paper book any time.  It won’t care if I leave it open for 3 days, drop it on the floor, stuff it in my back pocket or take it on a backwoods camping trip.

How does it cope with fire or flood? wink

Not in the same way an eBook reader would cope with it I’m afraid.

For instance I’ve heard that in a fire a Kindle eBook reader would leave you with a nice puddle of molten plastic. Try that with a paper book!

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Posted: 28 March 2011 06:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Yes, eBook are more efficient, convenient and more economical all the way around.  We have shelves and shelves of books as well as piled boxes of them in our home and I guarantee you we’re not unique.  These are books that have already been read, some by both of us.  We’ve packed up and given many away to various charities, FuzzyButt has turned a number of them into confetti, mice have turned others into nests and many other simply attract bugs, these last because books draw pests when you have enough of them.  We also throw some away but there is a sense that just discarding is such a waste of valuable writings as well.

The truth is that even if these are recycled, the energy it takes to recycle, add new pulped wood paper, ink etc. to another book is pretty expensive.  Save a tree and save energy at the front of a story and then behind it when you’re done reading…if it’s on an eBook. 

I know that on a Kindle the book you buy is ON it…I think someone here had the idea that you had to be connected to the internet while you read.  EBooks are typically more resilient to topical moisture, are fairly durable to bumps, are easier to carry around and read and for those who wear glasses these have adjustable font sizing. 

I still read regular books of course but for some books of cumbersome size, an eBook is the ONLY way to go….and if traveling, it surely is the only way to go since you can put many books on and still have only that slender piece of equipment to carry.

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Posted: 28 March 2011 07:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Mr R - 28 March 2011 08:29 AM
gray - 28 March 2011 01:38 AM

Give me a paper book any time.  It won’t care if I leave it open for 3 days, drop it on the floor, stuff it in my back pocket or take it on a backwoods camping trip.

How does it cope with fire or flood? wink

Probably as good or better than an e-reader.

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Posted: 28 March 2011 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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hulitoons - 28 March 2011 10:44 AM

Yes, eBook are more efficient, convenient and more economical all the way around.  We have shelves and shelves of books as well as piled boxes of them in our home and I guarantee you we’re not unique.  These are books that have already been read, some by both of us.  We’ve packed up and given many away to various charities, FuzzyButt has turned a number of them into confetti, mice have turned others into nests and many other simply attract bugs, these last because books draw pests when you have enough of them.  We also throw some away but there is a sense that just discarding is such a waste of valuable writings as well.

The truth is that even if these are recycled, the energy it takes to recycle, add new pulped wood paper, ink etc. to another book is pretty expensive.  Save a tree and save energy at the front of a story and then behind it when you’re done reading…if it’s on an eBook. 

I know that on a Kindle the book you buy is ON it…I think someone here had the idea that you had to be connected to the internet while you read.  EBooks are typically more resilient to topical moisture, are fairly durable to bumps, are easier to carry around and read and for those who wear glasses these have adjustable font sizing. 

I still read regular books of course but for some books of cumbersome size, an eBook is the ONLY way to go….and if traveling, it surely is the only way to go since you can put many books on and still have only that slender piece of equipment to carry.

Can the Kindle itself export a book to a common file format?

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Posted: 28 March 2011 08:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I’ve got a BeBook Mini (5 inch screen, rather than the standard 6 inch) eReader.  No complaints here.  In fact, within a week of me getting my BeBook, my parents went out and bought themselves the iRiver eReaders (and they’re in their 60’s-70’s).

Menus seem to depend on the eReader you’ve got.  Same with what formats of eBooks you can read.  I don’t think Amazon (and Kindle) offer any options for exporting their eBooks to a different format.  I know that they do do the reverse - for a fee…it’s one reason why I didn’t want to go for a Kindle in the first place (plus, there was that slightly annoying problem that they weren’t readily available to the Australian market 12 months ago).

The only complaint I really have about eReaders in general is just the availability of eBooks for the Australian market.  Again, this is a lot better now than it was 12 months ago.

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Posted: 28 March 2011 08:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Smerk - 28 March 2011 12:21 PM

I’ve got a BeBook Mini (5 inch screen, rather than the standard 6 inch) eReader.  No complaints here.  In fact, within a week of me getting my BeBook, my parents went out and bought themselves the iRiver eReaders (and they’re in their 60’s-70’s).

Menus seem to depend on the eReader you’ve got.  Same with what formats of eBooks you can read.  I don’t think Amazon (and Kindle) offer any options for exporting their eBooks to a different format.  I know that they do do the reverse - for a fee…it’s one reason why I didn’t want to go for a Kindle in the first place (plus, there was that slightly annoying problem that they weren’t readily available to the Australian market 12 months ago).

The only complaint I really have about eReaders in general is just the availability of eBooks for the Australian market.  Again, this is a lot better now than it was 12 months ago.

So I take it that it’s more versatile to buy an eReader that can read the ePub format rather than a Kindle. I notice the iPad can take both the Kindle software as well as let you read books in the ePub format.

I can see investigating this is going to be a major project for me. What have i done to myself?  shock

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Posted: 28 March 2011 09:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Yeah, probably be better (IMO) to get something other than a Kindle.  As far as I’m aware, all other eReaders support multiple formats (excluding the Kindle format).  Sony eReaders also have their own unique format, too.

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Posted: 28 March 2011 09:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Most e-readers will read their own, proprietary DRM format, a couple other secure formats that aren’t the exclusives for other readers (like ePub), and non-secure formats (PDF, rich text, raw text, jpgs, etc). One or two will ONLY read their own exclusive formats, but I forget which ones - check reports and feedback from users before buying. Exporting as a different format? Probably not. There’s no reason to convert, honestly. Anything you could copy is going to be readable on the target device anyway.

All in all, I’ve been following their development with interest. They have a very nice bundle of technology in a small, efficient package. The e-ink screen is very easy to read, even with small text - it’s like reading a normal book, rather than a screen. Thought has been put into making the controls as intuitive and easy to use as possible. If they could handle internet browsing even a little better, I’d probably be on one now instead of this netbook. Still, they’re very nice.

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1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

What part of ‘meow’ don’t you understand?

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Posted: 28 March 2011 04:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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I have Kindle on my Andriod phone. I like it. I’m getting all those old classics that I always meant to read and never did. My only problem is that I cannot take it inside my job with me. My job allows no cell phones inside buildings. I guess I could get the actual device but I have so many books to read I just take them with me

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