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Cookies and reporters don’t mix
Posted: 26 November 2010 05:48 PM   [ Ignore ]
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http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/11/26/3076929.htm?site=news

Cookie crumbles for Australian health bureaucrat

An incident involving a cookie has caused a top Australian health bureaucrat to lose his job fixing the Alberta Health System in Canada.

Stephen Duckett was hired last year to reduce Alberta’s long hospital waiting lists, but when he was doorstopped by journalists a few days ago he did not want to talk about the problem.

“Isn’t it ridiculous that the media are not prepared to go to the media scrum, and I’m eating my cookie,” he said.

When one journalist said: “I think people are interested in hearing from you sir”, Dr Duckett replied: “I’m interested in eating my cookie”.

Footage of the encounter in which Dr Ducket repeatedly uses the cookie reply has gone viral on the internet.

He apologised the next day, but the Alberta Heath Services Board has since announced his departure, saying there was mutual agreement it was time for him to move on.

Dr Duckett was previously in charge of fixing Queensland’s health system and has been secretary of the Australian Health Department.

And the video of the incident; I’m figuring that the whole “cookie incident” doesn’t really have much of anything to do with his leaving, unless he’s just tired of being pestered by rude reporters.

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Posted: 26 November 2010 06:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yeah.. Honestly? That equates out to a ‘no comment’ in my book, with the implied ‘You’re wasting my time’.

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Posted: 26 November 2010 09:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I suspect the cookie comment was the last straw.  The health care organization in the province is riddled with bureaucratic infighting over the best way to fix the system.  The government, the health board and the health care workers don’t really see eye to eye on a lot of things and I’m guessing this guy wasn’t able to make anything happen or come up with a solution that all sides could work with.  The health board in the province has made some really questionable decisions over the last few years and personally I think they all need to be replaced.

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Posted: 27 November 2010 10:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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True… There’s got to be more to it than just ‘I would *like* some time alone, *thank you*..’

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1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

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