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Is Usana a scam?
Posted: 20 September 2011 10:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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China Eyes - 20 September 2011 11:20 AM

I’m using USANA Essentials and Proflavanol. It is quite pricey than other local brands here in Manila but the product WORKS. I was taking less expensive brands of multivitamins a few years ago and I still got sick often. What I wanted was to avoid really bad colds and I couldn’t bear the chest pains and sleepless nights due to persistent coughing. I have two children and one is a toddler. Since I don’t get sick so often anymore I don’t put them at health risks and I am able to look after them like I should.

How about posting links to recognised scientific and unbiased medical studies to back up your claim that it works?

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Posted: 21 September 2011 02:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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This one is a gray area. It’s not like they’re selling holographic patches, placebos, snake oil, or dried stoats. They actually are selling something with bona fide medicinal value. Vitamins ARE good for you, and if your problems are caused by a vitamin deficiency, they WILL make you feel better.

The challenge comes in two forms:

First, they are claiming that OURS ARE BETTER. To be fair, this is standard marketing hyperbole. No product is going to claim they’re in third place. This isn’t to say they don’t work. They DO provide a potential, valid health benefit. The problem here is that they are making some fairly broad claims about what their products do, without providing back-up info. They are not cure-alls, they are not going to make your life better, they do not ‘dissolve faster/better’ than other brands. They. Are. Vitamins. Throw in the Placebo effect, and it’s no wonder people are willing to dance about shouting ‘They work!’.

Second, there is the aspect that it is a Multi Level Marketing setup. MLMs often sell fairly good products - Cutco’s knives are pretty decent, and Amway’s cleaning products do the job well. This is primarily so there is a source of income for the top-tier folks without resorting to JUST the entry fees from those below, which would make them even more of a Pyramid Scheme than they are now. Basically a thin veneer of legitimacy to give the impression that they aren’t just trying to sucker in newcomers. This is what makes MLM different from flat-out Pyramid Schemes.

So with those two factors in mind, is it any wonder we have a healthy amount of doubt when it comes to products like this? I wonder just what ‘level’ or ‘tier’, or whatever the folks who tout these pills have bought into, and are now trying to recoup their losses…

Show us that they really are better, with properly-conducted, unbiased, third-party clinical trials. Show us that you aren’t just tryng to sell these in order to make money through your MLM scheme. Until then, I’m sticking with my store brand one-a-days.

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1: Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. If it does what it says, you should have no problem with this.
2: What proof will you accept that you are wrong? You ask us to change our mind, but we cannot change yours?
3: It is not our responsability to disprove your claims, but rather your responsability to prove them.
4. Personal testamonials are not proof.

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Posted: 21 September 2011 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Plus there’s the matter that many of these products aren’t actually checked for health and quality control.  Some of the health supplements that come from overseas just have random stuff all thrown into them, sometimes including fun things such as arsenic and mercury.  Which is part of why they’re able to sell them so cheaply:  no research and development costs, no real production costs, no testing and licensing costs.

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Posted: 21 September 2011 06:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Robin Bobcat - 21 September 2011 02:42 AM

This one is a gray area. It’s not like they’re selling holographic patches, placebos, snake oil, or dried stoats. They actually are selling something with bona fide medicinal value. Vitamins ARE good for you, and if your problems are caused by a vitamin deficiency, they WILL make you feel better.

The challenge comes in two forms:

First, they are claiming that OURS ARE BETTER. To be fair, this is standard marketing hyperbole. No product is going to claim they’re in third place. This isn’t to say they don’t work. They DO provide a potential, valid health benefit. The problem here is that they are making some fairly broad claims about what their products do, without providing back-up info. They are not cure-alls, they are not going to make your life better, they do not ‘dissolve faster/better’ than other brands. They. Are. Vitamins. Throw in the Placebo effect, and it’s no wonder people are willing to dance about shouting ‘They work!’.

Second, there is the aspect that it is a Multi Level Marketing setup. MLMs often sell fairly good products - Cutco’s knives are pretty decent, and Amway’s cleaning products do the job well. This is primarily so there is a source of income for the top-tier folks without resorting to JUST the entry fees from those below, which would make them even more of a Pyramid Scheme than they are now. Basically a thin veneer of legitimacy to give the impression that they aren’t just trying to sucker in newcomers. This is what makes MLM different from flat-out Pyramid Schemes.

So with those two factors in mind, is it any wonder we have a healthy amount of doubt when it comes to products like this? I wonder just what ‘level’ or ‘tier’, or whatever the folks who tout these pills have bought into, and are now trying to recoup their losses…

Show us that they really are better, with properly-conducted, unbiased, third-party clinical trials. Show us that you aren’t just tryng to sell these in order to make money through your MLM scheme. Until then, I’m sticking with my store brand one-a-days.

I have to admit I do take multivitamins. My doctor has told me they would be good for me.

But I do not buy them from an MLM thing. Nor do I claim they have miraculous healing effects. I just buy normal brands from well known sources like supermarkets or my local pharmacy. I tend to think the real benefits from vitamins happen gradually over time and are subtler than what is claimed by the MLM people. I have to agree that the claims made by MLMs sound too good to be true and so far I haven’t seen them provide any proof in terms of links to real scientific studies.

Yes I think the store brand (in my case the pharmacy brand) one-a-day’s tend to be good value and I haven’t heard them make outrageous claims. Although I’m currently using a different brand than that.

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Posted: 25 September 2011 03:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Hi!

I normally do not believed in supplements and me and my family normally just take some branded vitamin C until I found out this USANA health and Science and dig about their supplements and I saw their quality and some of their supplements are from Oliveol.  Now, I started buying this products.  I think everybody is concern of the value of their money.  I am willing to pay a bit pricey now for my health rather than pay more pricey because I did not maintain my good health and hospitalization is more PRICEY .

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Posted: 25 September 2011 03:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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pregyrick - 25 September 2011 03:08 AM

Hi!

I normally do not believed in supplements and me and my family normally just take some branded vitamin C until I found out this USANA health and Science and dig about their supplements and I saw their quality and some of their supplements are from Oliveol.  Now, I started buying this products.  I think everybody is concern of the value of their money.  I am willing to pay a bit pricey now for my health rather than pay more pricey because I did not maintain my good health and hospitalization is more PRICEY .

How about providing some proof. Show us links to scientific trials.

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Posted: 25 September 2011 03:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Peter - 25 September 2011 03:26 AM

How about providing some proof. Show us links to scientific trials.

Why?  They’re only saying that they’re buying the stuff, not that it actually works or anything.  Or maybe you want scientific proof that the Usana stuff is “more pricey”?

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Posted: 25 September 2011 05:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Smerk - 25 September 2011 03:48 AM
Peter - 25 September 2011 03:26 AM

How about providing some proof. Show us links to scientific trials.

Why?  They’re only saying that they’re buying the stuff, not that it actually works or anything.  Or maybe you want scientific proof that the Usana stuff is “more pricey”?

OK. downer

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Posted: 25 September 2011 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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And then there’s getting your vitamins and minerals through food.  Not very popular these days.  It’s easier to eat a McDouble and pop a Flintstones muti with your coke and fries.  grin

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Posted: 25 September 2011 01:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Bebelicious - 25 September 2011 12:53 PM

It’s easier to eat a McDouble and pop a Flintstones muti with your coke and fries.

It’s funny how your typo (I’m assuming that it is one, at least) is actually completely correct, seeing as how “muti” is basically a generic term in much of Africa for the witch-doctor medicine which is often totally ineffective and sometimes directly harmful.

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Posted: 16 January 2012 02:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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chok0514 - 15 January 2012 11:41 PM

Apart from this, you may also search the awards they received from national and international award-giving organizations by looking them up at Businessweek dot com…

All that tells me is a lot of people spend money on it. I didn’t see any mention of it actually helping people in a real sense.

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