1900 | 1901 | 1902 | 1903 | 1904 | 1905 | 1906 | 1907 | 1908 | 1909 |
1910 | 1911 | 1912 | 1913 | 1914 | 1915 | 1916 | 1917 | 1918 | 1919 |
1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923 | 1924 | 1925 | 1926 | 1927 | 1928 | 1929 |
1930 | 1931 | 1932 | 1933 | 1934 | 1935 | 1936 | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 |
1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943 | 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 |
1950 | 1951 | 1952 | 1953 | 1954 | 1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 |
1960 | 1961 | 1962 | 1963 | 1964 | 1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969 |
1970 | 1971 | 1972 | 1973 | 1974 | 1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979 |
1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983 | 1984 | 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 |
1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 |
2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 |
2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015

The YouTube Collection    (April Fool's Day - 2012)

YouTube debuted their latest innovation. Every video ever uploaded to YouTube, made available on DVDs. Upon ordering, the DVDs would be shipped to your home in 175 YouTube trucks, arriving in shrink-wrapped crates on pallets. A new truck would then arrive every week, with all the latest videos.

Owners of the DVD collection would be able to experience YouTube while completely offline, but they wouldn't lose interactivity. By filling out a comment form and placing it in a stamped, self-addressed envelope, they could send feedback directly to the creator of any particular video.




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