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Four-Story Bus    (April Fool's Day - 1931)



A Berlin newspaper published a photo of a four-story bus. The offices of several local bus lines were subsequently flooded by calls from people who wanted to ride in "the world's first and only four-story motor bus."

Crowds of curiosity-seekers also invaded the garages where the public buses were housed. And the newspaper itself received several thousand letters inquiring where the bus could be seen, how many people it could hold, how fast it could travel, how much it cost to build, and how it managed to go under bridges and trolley wires without being wrecked. [Milwaukee Sentinel - May 17, 1931]

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