The Museum of Hoaxes
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The Hoax Museum Blog
Hoaxes, mischief, and misinformation throughout history
A photo supposedly showing a "Sasquatch watching a passing train" recently began doing the rounds online, after it appeared as the Photo of the Day on the website of Coast to Coast AM, where it was submitted by "Ricky B". A caption with the photo read, "Picture was taken on a cell phone from a moving train near Hayden Lake, Idaho. 8-19-2014. [The creature is enlarged in the square on the right]" However, the community of Bigfoot advocates managed to expose this as a hoax on their own, figuring out that the photo did indeed show a Sasquatch watching a train. However, it wasn't a living Sasquatch. It was a model…
Posted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 Comments (0)

For £800, you can purchase this genuine Feejee Mermaid from Pyewackett & Pecke, makers of curios, oddities, & artefacts. But UK delivery only, due to its fragility. If you buy it, you may also be able to negotiate inclusion of the "Automated Sideshow Teller" and have yourself an exhibit.
Posted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 Comments (0)

CBC Radio's satirical This is That show recently ran a segment about artist Lana Newstrom, who is supposedly making millions by selling invisible art. The show quotes Newstrom as saying, "Art is about imagination and that is what my work demands of the people interacting with it. You have to imagine a painting or sculpture is in front of you." The show's web page for the segment included a photo of art enthusiasts staring at blank walls in a gallery, apparently admiring Newstrom's paintings and sculptures. The image was actually a doctored version of a photo taken by Adriano Castelli showing people at Phil Stern's photograhy exhibition in Milan, Italy, June…
Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 Comments (0)

An article in the NY Times briefly profiles Emergent, a new website created by Craig Silverman which aims to track the dissemination of rumors online. It records how many shares a rumor has received, and also assesses whether the rumor is true, false, or unverified. Looks like a very useful site! The NY Times article notes that the problem with false rumors is that "they're often much more interesting than the truth." Therefore, they get more widely shared. The challenge, says the Times, "is to make the facts as fun to share as the myths they seek to replace." Nice goal, but I don't see it ever happening. The false rumors can endlessly transform themselves to appeal to our deepest hopes and fears. Whereas the facts always have to remain boringly factual.
Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 Comments (0)


The Asahi Shimbun (circulation 7.6 million) recently issued some corrections. It was not true, despite previous statements, that writer Seiji Yoshida had kidnapped 200 women during World War II to act as "comfort women." Apparently Yoshida made up his claims. Nor was it true that workers at the Fukushima plant had disobeyed orders and fled the plant during the nuclear disaster. The newspaper misinterpreted documents. Finally, it wasn't true that the paper had interviewed the president of Nintendo. The paper had lifted responses from an interview published on the Nintendo website and passed them off as an Asahi Shimbun interview. iMediaEthics
Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 Comments (0)

Prankster Philip Bradbury tweeted Donald Trump a photo, telling him it was a photo of his parents and asking if Trump could retweet it in their memory because he was a "big inspiration" to them. Trump obliged. But it turned out the photo was actually of the English serial killers Fred and Rose West. Trump's response: "Some jerk fraudulently tweeted that his parents said I was a big inspiration to them + pls RT — out of kindness I retweeted. Maybe I'll sue." Yeah, the prank was a bit juvenile, but it's classic Trump to threaten to sue. Reminds me of April Fool's Day 1971, when the…
Posted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 Comments (2)

The Cyranoid Illusion, named after the French play Cyrano de Bergerac, refers to a person who is not speaking their own thoughts, but rather the thoughts and words of another person fed to them via radio transmitter. A recent experiment has found that people can't tell when they're speaking to a Cyranoid, probably because our brains haven't evolved to detect when a person is speaking through the body of someone else. The problem is, the online world is full of Cyranoids. "From online games to online dating sites, people act through virtual versions of themselves (or assumed virtual identities) more and more." [wired.com]
Posted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 Comments (0)

A notice recently posted on the door of a "small building" in the village of Kingswinford has announced that the pub chain Wetherspoons will soon be opening a "Microspoons" mini-bar there, to be staffed by "a person of reduced height." The bar will only have room for 3 people (height restrictions will apply). It will only serve 1 lager, and entertainment will consist of "Sky Sports on 3-inch microscreen." The pub will be called "The Shorter Arms." Wetherspoons itself has denied any knowledge of this new bar. The Stourbridge News speculates that the sign marks the return of the Kingswinford Hoaxer, who was active about a decade ago. Some of the…
Posted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 Comments (0)

It looks like Jasmine Tridevil will be a popular theme for costumes this Halloween. HalloweenCostumes.com offers instructions for a "DIY 3 breasted woman Halloween Costume."
Posted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 Comments (1)

Gestations promises it will be the "premiere bar for pregnant women to drink without being judged" when it opens on October 25 in New York City. It's Facebook page has some flashy graphics, and there really is a storefront at the advertised location (on the corner of Avenue A and East 5th St.) that bears a Gestations sign. (Or, at least, someone has decorated the windows of an empty storefront with Gestations decals.) However, it's hard to believe any bar would seriously target pregnant women as their demographic of choice. (The…
Posted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 Comments (0)

Bob Zmuda and Lynn Margulies have a new book out titled Andy Kaufman: The Truth, Finally. According to the NY Post, much of the book details Zmuda's belief that Kaufman faked his death, as well as how Kaufman pulled off the stunt. Apparently it was a body double that died at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in May 1984, not Kaufman. And Kaufman, says Zmuda, will be coming back any day now, because it's been 30 years since his death, and Kaufman promised Zmuda he would return in 30 years. Except he's already 4 months late.
Posted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 Comments (0)

September 28, 1980: Jimmy's World
On this day in 1980, the Washington Post ran a story on its front page by reporter Janet Cooke about "Jimmy," an 8-year-old heroin addict. The story eventually won her a Pulitzer Prize. But as pressure on Cooke mounted to reveal where Jimmy lived, so that he could be helped, she finally admitted that she had never met Jimmy and that much of her story was fictitious. Cooke resigned, and the Post, humiliated by the incident, returned the Pulitzer Prize. More…
Posted: Sun Sep 28, 2014 Comments (0)

September 26, 1995: Transatlantic Paper Airplane
On this day in 1995, the Weekly World News reported that a paper airplane thrown by a school girl in North Carolina had been lifted up by "turbulent winds" and landed in Portugal. The article promptly made its way onto the Internet, where many people mistook it for real news, including the producers of The Family Channel TV special Unbelievable, who admitted that they made dozens of calls trying to track down the girl named in the story. [Weekly World News]
Posted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 Comments (1)

September 25, 1973: The Knocking Ghost of Boise
Police in Boise, Idaho were initially stumped by the case of an apparent ghost in the house of Peggy Zimmerman. The ghost made knocking sounds on the floor and could rap out correct answers to questions. The mystery was solved on this day in 1973 by a TV newsman who realized that the source of the rapping was Mrs. Zimmerman's young daughter, Shelley, who was always present when the ghost was rapping. Shelley had the ability to surreptitiously crack her ankle by flexing it, thereby making a loud knocking sound. More…
Posted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 Comments (0)

On August 31, 1959, a remarkable human-interest story hit the news wires and ran in papers throughout the United States. Jean Naccarelli, a 46-year-old Pittsburgh housewife, had learned that she had inherited $2 million from a wealthy uncle named John Lennon who had lived in Aberdeen, Scotland. She had received the news via a cablegram sent from Scotland by her two aunts. The 78-year-old Lennon, Naccarelli explained to the press, had been a famous ship designer who had worked on the Queen Mary. He was her father's brother. She had met her uncle only twice, once in 1924 when she visited Scotland and a second time in 1952 when he came to Pittsburgh. Nevertheless, she was the…
Posted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 Comments (1)

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All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.