The Museum of Hoaxes
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The Hoax Museum Blog
Hoaxes, mischief, and misinformation throughout history
Philadelphia DJ claims on air that his traffic reporter has one of the winning tickets for the $230 million Powerball lottery. A media frenzy ensues, followed by outrage when it all turns out to be a hoax.
Posted: Mon Jul 14, 2003 Comments (0)

Four teenagers confess to having made the crop circles that appeared in the Sacramento Valley a few weeks ago (the largest circles ever to appear in the US). But others think the teenagers are lying.
Posted: Mon Jul 14, 2003 Comments (0)

Jeff Germann, webmaster of the Superman Museum in Metropolis, IL, writes to tell of an April Fool's Day prank he pulled in the Superman Collectors Monthly Newsletter. With a little help from Photoshop, he managed to convince quite a few people that the Superman statue standing outside the museum had been stolen. He says: This one article resulted in more emails than any other article we posted. Believe it or not, I am STILL receiving emails at times from people who are upset over the theft of a fifteen foot tall bronze statue, even though on the "update" link, I come clean about it being a prank.  
Posted: Sun Jul 13, 2003 Comments (0)

A New Jersey DJ charmed listeners with her thick Irish brogue and tales of her life growing up in the Emerald Isle. Just one problem. She grew up in New Jersey. (Via the hoaxes community on LiveJournal)
Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2003 Comments (0)


A visitor asks if Eurorest is a hoax? Well, if not a hoax, then it's definitely a scam. The premise of Eurorest is that if you agree to send a message promoting their business to seven of your friends (i.e. if you agree to turn yourself into a spammer acting on their behalf), then they'll send you a 'cheque' that you can use to get 14 free days of stay at participating European hotels. But here's where it gets fishy. Sending off the emails doesn't automatically get you a 'cheque.' It only enrolls you in a lottery with the possibility that you'll receive one of these cheques. Who wants to bet that the cheque would never arrive? Plus, when…
Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2003 Comments (8)

A visitor pointed out to me that I had neglected to include Lake Michigan Whale Watching in my list of hoax sites. Plus, while we're on the subject of whale watching in the midwest, let's not forget the web page devoted to the wonders of Mankato, Minnesota, where the temperature never drops below 70 degrees fahrenheit, even in the dead of winter, thanks to the presence of hot springs that heat the air. Mankato boasts a thriving whale watching industry on account of the annual summer migration of the whales up the Minnesota River. And to return to Lake Michigan, who can forget the case of the Viagra spill that temporarily revived its flagging spirits.
Posted: Sat Jul 12, 2003 Comments (0)

A visitor (Bill Graham) informed me of a memorable hoax that I missed: Ye Olde Frothingsloth Pale Stale Ale. Frothingslosh is a unique beer that's so light that the beer actually floats on top of the foam. It all started out as a running joke on Rege Cordic's Pittsburgh radio show in the 1950s. He made up all kinds of joke ads for this fictitious beer and invented slogans such as "A whale of an ale for the pale stale male" and "Hi dittom dottom, the foam is on the bottom." But the Olde Frothingsloth concept became so popular, that eventually it caught the attention of the Pittsburgh Brewing Co.
Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2003 Comments (15)

Heineken invites you to create your own hoax.
Posted: Thu Jul 10, 2003 Comments (0)

Last week everyone was linking to this spoof about the missing Weapons of Mass Destruction. It even managed to become the first item displayed if you typed in 'Weapons of Mass Destruction' on Google (though Google has since changed that). In the same spirit, here's a spoof page about Jayson Blair and the New York Times.
Posted: Thu Jul 10, 2003 Comments (0)

It sounded awful. Five puppies thrown onto the highway from a moving car. Tracy Lloyd claimed that she managed to save one of them, while other motorists scooped up the other four. Turns out the whole tale was bogus. Lloyd wasn't allowed to keep pets in her apartment, so she had made up a sob-story to convince her landlord to bend the rules for her. Her story was exposed when the person who sold the dog to her saw Lloyd telling about the highway incident on tv.
Posted: Thu Jul 10, 2003 Comments (2)

David Emery, of About.com's Urban Legends and Folklore page, found out that the Baby Ink tattoo parlor was an April Fool's day joke created by a couple of San Diego DJs. The DJs boast about the prank on their website (you need to scroll about halfway down to find the reference).
Posted: Thu Jul 10, 2003 Comments (0)

Finally an answer to the riddle of 'what is Splat' that sounds like it's probably correct. According to John Lundberg of circlemakers.org, Splat was a sculpture created by the British artist John Isaacs in the mid 1990s.
Posted: Thu Jul 10, 2003 Comments (0)

On July 8, 1947, 56 years ago today, the Roswell Daily Record made UFO history by announcing on its front page the discovery by the army of a flying saucer in the Roswell region. The army soon retracted its statement that it had discovered a flying saucer, leading to ever-growing suspicion of a cover-up. Here's a transcript of the 1947 article.
Posted: Wed Jul 09, 2003 Comments (0)

Here's the latest hoax website making the rounds: Baby Ink, a tattoo parlor for kids. The site claims that any kid over the age of six months is allowed to get a tattoo as long as their parent signs a consent form. But I don't believe that's right. That would be a bit like saying kids are allowed to smoke or drink alcohol as long as their parents consent to it. No, I think you have to be 18 or over to get a tattoo (or is it 16 and over?). The site lists a San Diego location that's quite near to where I live. I think I'll drive by and see what's actually there.
Posted: Wed Jul 09, 2003 Comments (1)

A reporter at the Roswell Daily Record gets fired for printing a quote he claimed to have gotten from a groundskeeper at a local golf course named 'Carl Spangler.' In reality, the quote came from Bill Murray's character in Caddyshack, 'Carl Spackler.' The quote referred to a new type of hybrid grass developed by the groundskeeper that had this amazing feature: "you can play 36 holes on it in the afternoon, take it home and just get stoned to the bejeezus-belt that night on the stuff."
Posted: Mon Jul 07, 2003 Comments (0)

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All text Copyright © 2014 by Alex Boese, except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.